Shamed into it

Ok, guys, all of you who are coming to the Tour de Smo' (aka, mountain gathering in NC) and who have been trying to shame me into replacing the trans nosecone mount so that I can drive the Speedster instead of the BMW can rest a little easier.  I am going to try to get it done before the trip.  This weekend is more of a hunker down weekend (stay away, Irma!), but I have managed to borrow a motorcycle jack to drop the engine.  This will be the inaugural project in the new garage/shop.  I'm sure I'll get the first oil stains on the new floor.  I have two weekends between now and the trip to do this.

Anyway, I could use any tips, shortcuts, or recommendations from those of you that have done this before.  My first (of many) question is what part of the engine should I rest on the jack?  I am pretty sure I shouldn't rest the pushrod tubes, but the most likely spot at present looks like the CB Perf. thin line sump.  Not sure that's good either.  Question #2: leave the Sidewinder exhaust on or take it off?  I'm sure I'll think of more.

1957 Beck Speedster ('06 Carlisle build car)

Original Post

The sump is more than strong enough to support the engine's weight. I like to put a thin piece of plywood between the 2 so it spreads the load and there's no weight on any specific spots. Are you going to drop the engine first or try to pull the engine/trans back as a unit? While I'm sure it can be done without dropping the engine first, it will be easier by yourself to not be dealing with the engine being up there as well. Al

PS- Listening to Rory Gallagher's "Defender" album while writing this. Love his music! A shame I never saw him though...

Lane Anderson posted:

...My first (of many) question is what part of the engine should I rest on the jack?  I am pretty sure I shouldn't rest the pushrod tubes, but the most likely spot at present looks like the CB Perf. thin line sump.  Not sure that's good either.  Question #2: leave the Sidewinder exhaust on or take it off?  I'm sure I'll think of more.

#1.  Like Al said, supporting the engine on the sump is fine.  Using a piece of plywood is a good idea to distribute the weight and keep the engine from slipping around on the jack.

#2.  I would remove the exhaust.  It will make dropping the engine much easier because you will have more room to work.  Also, check the clearance between the carbs/air cleaners and the frame.  This may not be an issue on a Beck, but I have to remove my air cleaners and my carbs will clear by 1/2" on each side! 

Good Luck!  You can do it, these things are pretty easy to work on.

James

Maybe I ought to go out into the garage today whilst Irma has me stuck at home and get started.  Nah, I'd rather hunker down on the sofa and listen to the wind.  We're sustained in the 20's and gusts near 50.  Power has flickered a few times but the lights are still on.  Besides, I has the garage full of all of the stuff from the yard so I won't have to go looking for it when this is over.

I'll get the engine warmed up and the oil drained in the next day or so.  Probably start disconnecting things so the engine pull this weekend is relatively quick.

Lane, I use an ATV jack with 2 parallel support points that I got from HF.  On top of those supports I use an old boat cushion to contact the sump.  This gives you support and also allows you to wiggle the engine a little bit to get it off the bolts and get by the frame rails.  Then I placed a scissor jack under the transmission on a creeper or furniture mover and loosened all the bolts holding the transmission in place.   Then I pulled it to the rear with a heavy duty ratchet strap using the frame in the rear. Just enough room to slide in the new mount.  Not a 5 min. job, at least for me.

Oh yeah, don't forget to disconnect the the shift rod coupler.  Duh.  I have a swing axle so your milage may vary there as well. Best of luck and don't pinch your fingers.  Also, this would be the time to replace the rear mounts, but you knew that.

Ok, I busted my tail this weekend and got the engine out and the transaxle loose.  A friend came by and we got the old nosecone mount out and the new one in, but I cannot get the two trans mounts at the bell housing to line up with the bolt holes.  That was enough for today.  Assuming those mounts are the same for Becks as for regular VWs, are they symmetrical fore and aft?  Are they side-specific?

Yeah, that's a pain in the ass! Everything loose, get them all started and then tighten.

Make sure you put the same bolts in the same way. I helped a friend with his 356B motor swap and couldn't slide the motor "home". Bolts were too long when he swapped the trans mounts. SMH and not installed by me!

Yes it is.  I hope whoever buys it is a serious enthusiast who regularly attends Carlisle and other gatherings.

By the way, IT'S ALIVE!!!  It's alive!!

I need to clean the grease off of it (and me) and put some miles on it this afternoon to make sure it's good to go for the trip.  The spa day will probably be spread across the next couple of evenings.

One that I do not wish to repeat, Al.  

The test drive of some 20-30 miles went well.  The throttle seems a bit sticky, with a hot idle of around 1300.  I've chased this off and on several times and won't let it stop me from driving.  Something is binding on the throttle linkage.

More worrisome was one of my stalling incidents that plagued me on the last Carlisle trip (2016).  I had thought that I traced it to overfilling the gas talk and getting fuel in the vent hose, causing some kind of a vacuum to be created.  It almost always occurred within an hour or two of filling the tank on the road.  This time it happened with less than half a tank, but still was resolved by popping the gas cap off.  I don't want to be stopping every few miles to do that, but it could be months before it happens again.  It's just seems random except that it almost always occurs when I'm running at highway speeds.  I've swapped fuel pumps, so I am pretty sure that isn't it.  At this point I will probably drive the Speedster, but if anyone has an idea what this might be, I am all ears. 

Lane Anderson posted:

One that I do not wish to repeat, Al.  

The test drive of some 20-30 miles went well.  The throttle seems a bit sticky, with a hot idle of around 1300.  I've chased this off and on several times and won't let it stop me from driving.  Something is binding on the throttle linkage.

More worrisome was one of my stalling incidents that plagued me on the last Carlisle trip (2016).  I had thought that I traced it to overfilling the gas talk and getting fuel in the vent hose, causing some kind of a vacuum to be created.  It almost always occurred within an hour or two of filling the tank on the road.  This time it happened with less than half a tank, but still was resolved by popping the gas cap off.  I don't want to be stopping every few miles to do that, but it could be months before it happens again.  It's just seems random except that it almost always occurs when I'm running at highway speeds.  I've swapped fuel pumps, so I am pretty sure that isn't it.  At this point I will probably drive the Speedster, but if anyone has an idea what this might be, I am all ears. 

Is it possible the fuel cap pressure release valve not working? Could this cause vacuum pressure in the tank that prevents fuel from flowing out of the tank?

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