Skip to main content

Had a friend change the oil on my 1915cc  vw engine.  Was a VS from Kirk built in 2005.  The engine had an oil pan/plate without a plug.  When he took the 6 bolts out he had trouble getting the plate/screen off, he said it was like it had be attached with silicone.  He replaced it with a plate/screen that had a plug in it, and a new gasket.  This is the first time the engine ever had an oil leak.  He told me to tighten all the bolts crosswise about a quarter tune.  I did this a couple times and all but one bolt tightened up.  The one bolt seems to be stripped , so it never gets totally tight, and this seems to be where it is leaking oil.

 

Options:

1.  Do I try a new bolt, if its the bolt threads, and not the hole threads?

2.  Should I take the plate off and try to re-tap the hole to a larger size? 

3.  Can I just take the bolt out and re-tap it through the plate, since that hole will probably not fit a larger bolt?

4.  If I re-tap the hole, does it still have to be metric since its going to be different than the other holes?  Should all the holes be re-tapped, so they are all the same size?

I'm very much a novice here, so don't go all technical on me, please.  I will probable borrow a tap and die set from a friend, so I hope it does metric.

Thanks ahead of time, have had the car a year and half now, so this is the first real issue.

Greg    

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

It sounds like either the bolt (stud) or the nut is stripped. Either way if you want to replace the stud you can. The suspect stud can be taken off, generally, with an allen wrench. Check the end of the stud to see if has an allen head. If it doesn't you can just grip it with a pair of locking pliers and back it out. You could also consider just replacing them all. A new set should have allen heads on the studs and that is how you install them with some blue Loctitie also. Make sure you also use new copper washers, don't reuse the old ones. Also, make sure the Loctite has dried thoroughly and that the stud is inserted far enough so the acorn nut doesn't bottom out before getting tight enough.

https://www.cbperformance.com/product-p/1762.htm

Last edited by Robert M

FYI, magnesium is even softer than aluminum.

Greg(Wolfgang), that is a GREAT tip. This could really save someone(New Greg!).

Here is a link to the studs:

https://www.amazon.com/Step-St...-Buggy/dp/B076HWWZ1D

The one stud that never strips is the one that holds oil pickup.That stud is VERY difficult to get out, but it can be done. I did it with a lot of swearing and I had to dent the pickup a little with a good-sized hammer and drift. Then I could get a wrench into the assembled motor and remove it. So much easier if the case is split............

The one stud that never strips is the one that holds oil pickup.That stud is VERY difficult to get out, but it can be done. I did it with a lot of swearing and I had to dent the pickup a little with a good-sized hammer and drift. Then I could get a wrench into the assembled motor and remove it. So much easier if the case is split............

I think you meant ALWAYS strips. I did the bent wrench tango to do the replacement. What a PIA.

@Theron posted:

One of the reasons this site exists is because of our shared hatred of oil plate studs.

-=theron

My theory is that the Sainted German Engineers designed the entire oiling system on a Friday afternoon around 3:15, while Octoberfest was setting up outside the window. They had already had a couple of steins when the tubas started tuning up. About then, all progress halted and we've got what we've got.

Last edited by Stan Galat

Guys they are just regular 10mm bolts, not Allen heads and I don't think they even have washers.  6 bolts in the plate that has the oil plug in the plate.  One bolt just keeps spinning and won' get tight.  Is Loctite going to fix a problem like that, or maybe just a new bolt, or adding some washers (which doesn't seem logical from a design aspect), any other suggestions.

So the one bolt that keeps spinning is stripped. The only solution is the stepped stud that I linked above, and a tap/drill to replace it. Wolfgang's posted article is a step-by-step of what to do.

Bolts into the bottom of the case are a BAD idea, studs are better. Somebody else on here with a type4 found that out the hard way with his header bolted to the heads. The bolts stripped out the soft threads in the head. ALWAYS use studs in aluminum or magnesium.

It's either the stepped stud or a thread insert. And DON'T use a heli-coil, they are JUNK.

If you want to use an insert, use time-certs, a much better fix. It's the right way to do it.

Good article but what is missing is how to tighten the acorn nuts, with a short 1/4 drive ratchet snug them (along with the sealing washer) against the oil plate alternating the nuts opposite one another. Then using your pinky finger in the middle of the short 1/4 ratchet tighten each acorn nut another 1/4 turn and ....Stop. This is my method and have yet to strip a stud or have leaks.

I was mistaken, I talked to the friend who changed the oil for me and they are studs and nuts.  He has worked on vw's for years, built 11 dune buggies and 2 airplanes.  He told me to check the nut but if the stud comes out with it, obviously its stripped.  He has a metric tap so we can drill it out if needed and us a larger step stud.  I think this must have been an issue for the prior owner, because it was like they siliconed the plate on before they tightened the nuts, hence no leaking.  It would have been nice if they would have put a new plate on with a plug before they siliconed it last time, but that's life.

Thanks again guys,

Greg

     

I wonder if you drained oil and cleaned area well if JB Weld might hold the stud tight?  I have a engine case that had water in it and it corroded the magnesium around the drain plate.  Builder that did a line bore and head rebuild said to use JB Weld to make a smooth mounting surface (haven't gotten to it yet).  

What's consensus of steel vs billet aluminum sump plate.  Seems the aluminum would match the cases expansion characteristics  better than steel.

Image result for VW Billet Drain Plate

 

Last edited by WOLFGANG
@DannyP posted:

So the one bolt that keeps spinning is stripped. The only solution is the stepped stud that I linked above, and a tap/drill to replace it. Wolfgang's posted article is a step-by-step of what to do.

Bolts into the bottom of the case are a BAD idea, studs are better. Somebody else on here with a type4 found that out the hard way with his header bolted to the heads. The bolts stripped out the soft threads in the head. ALWAYS use studs in aluminum or magnesium.

It's either the stepped stud or a thread insert. And DON'T use a heli-coil, they are JUNK.

If you want to use an insert, use time-certs, a much better fix. It's the right way to do it.

After a Triumph dealership stripped 2 out 6 theads on my Sprints valve cover, I took them all out and installed Timserts. It’s how they’d always do threads in aluminum or magnesium if they took the time IMO. 

As for JB, I’d be leery. I have used a Permatex product called ThreadRestorer (iirc) a couple of times to good effect on low torque applications, but I doubt you would get good results on oil filter plates because I doubt you could get the work area clean enough without removing the engine. 

When I just did the two in my case, I cleaned the threads as best I could and used Permatex Thread Sealer which, afaik, is Red+, and let it set for 24 hrs.

Add Reply

Post Content
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×