At what point can a few parts upgrades be considered a 'frame on' restoration? A hypothetical question, but maybe there is an answer to this?   

Built in '92 with full documented ownership in CA, VIN #195 is well on it's way to catching many more years of attention. Previous owners kept great records including the original Beck order form. I intend to be the best 'care-taker' I can be. With car show season beginning in April/May here in CA, I maintain a good line of sight on the goal. I have several great resources available....and appreciate the help from the community so far. Certainly the 2020 West Coast cruise is a goal as well.

Tried out my new pressurized steam cleaner which was integral in removing old grime, I recommend it for an engine detail. Now with a clean slate, the parts list is growing.

Sourced one of the most significant components, a gorgeous stainless steel exhaust system from @VSpyder Thank you Greg.

Plans so far...

- new exhaust

- new tires

- complete engine and transaxle service

- new brake lines

- new steering wheel and related components

- battery relocation to firewall

- relocate oil cooler and lines

- GT mirror install

- new carpet and tonneau

- new turn signal lenses front and rear

- new seat belts

- various other fit and finish updatesIMG_4941IMG_5058IMG_5063IMG_5064IMG_5043

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Oh ya, well last year, the bike was brand new and also the GoPro, so was compelled to put 2 and 2 together on such a pretty day... 

@ALB, removing the battery box (previously mounted drivers side rear of the axle) and also removing the old exhaust cleared a lot of space to work. Underside looks good, and I believe I can do some touchups without unbolting anything further.

Don't want to upset the wife or neighbors with an engine on the patio or living room. 

SimplifyTALightness posted:

At what point can a few parts upgrades be considered a 'frame on' restoration? A hypothetical question, but maybe there is an answer to this?   

Built in '92 with full documented ownership in CA, VIN #195 is well on it's way to catching many more years of attention. Previous owners kept great records including the original Beck order form. I intend to be the best 'care-taker' I can be. With car show season beginning in April/May here in CA, I maintain a good line of sight on the goal. I have several great resources available....and appreciate the help from the community so far. Certainly the 2020 West Coast cruise is a goal as well.

Tried out my new pressurized steam cleaner which was integral in removing old grime, I recommend it for an engine detail. Now with a clean slate, the parts list is growing.

Sourced one of the most significant components, a gorgeous stainless steel exhaust system from @VSpyder Thank you Greg.

Plans so far...

- new exhaust

- new tires

- complete engine and transaxle service

- new brake lines

- new steering wheel and related components

- battery relocation to firewall

- relocate oil cooler and lines

- GT mirror install

- new carpet and tonneau

- new turn signal lenses front and rear

- new seat belts

- various other fit and finish updatesIMG_4941IMG_5058IMG_5063IMG_5064IMG_5043

@SimplifyTALightness Are you in Northern or Southern Cali 🏄🏾‍♀️🚙🤙

SimplifyTALightness posted:

 

...Don't want to upset the wife or neighbors with an engine on the patio or living room. 

I've rebuilt 3 VW engine inside- the first on a table in the basement of the family home when I was 19 (my stepmother wasn't pleased, but we all survived), another on the kitchen table of my apartment (I was 21? 22?) and you can imagine my brother and I pushing this thing complete down the hallway to the elevator on a dolley hoping not to get caught by the building manager! The third I finished the top end assembly on the kitchen table of my first house. I wasn't married and my 2 room mates didn't seem to mind. A couple more in the garage proper and that's it for engine parts in the house- except, of course, for baking pieces in the kitchen oven after cleaning and painting with rust paint- let it dry in the garage overnight, and then when the wife's not home the next day bake at 150-160°F for ½ hour. There's no smell (most of the solvent outgassing happened overnight and any residual will clear before she gets home) and the stuff is really tough! Al

IaM-Ray posted:

@ALB  My wife's nose is pretty sensitive I wonder if I could get away with it here... 

Do you run it on convection? 

I pre-heated the oven, hung the pieces and left them in there for ½ hour. The kitchen fan was on and the slider on to the deck was open so there never really was much of any smell in the kitchen. My oldest (who has a sensitive nose and palate) came home shortly after I finished the first time and didn't smell anything. They were painted the day before hanging in a box and a heater was blowing on them for a few hours afterward. When I hung them in the oven they were quite dry to the touch but felt soft (fresh). Afterwards they almost feel like powdercoat. I've used the same method on 2 batches and they've both come out the same.

And no, I didn't use convection.

Weight and appearance

Size 26F is the smallest and cheapest lead acid readily available with the most CCAs, enough for the starter. There are smaller and lighter batteries out there but not worth the extra cost I've found to save a few pounds

outboard of the rear axle, that defeats the concept of a mid-engine in my opinion. It's a big (ugly) heavy weight out there, not ideal. I'm not setting up for racing, but I like to think about those elements. Firewall is central and passenger side attempts to balance weight when driving solo. These are small things but when you have the freedom to choose, can't help but think about it.

did I mention the battery is ugly. I'd rather show off that pretty MagnaFlow logo and welds on those mufflers.

@edsnova Have considered the front compartment several times. I ended up passing on that to avoid drilling additional holes for the cables, and also because having the compartment remain clear is a bonus for potential overnight luggage, or knowing us, wine tasting souvenirs go there.

Odyssey is great and that would be my go-to application for extreme weight savings or offroad. Their 'Extreme' series cuts weight and dimensions in half from lead acid. If it was closer in price to the standard i'd do it but lead acid is roughly 1/4 the price. I'm taking that $ saved and buying a Beck T-shirt or two 

 

I use a lead acid lawn tractor battery. Size is U1, is 5 3/16" wide by 7.75" long, about 7.5" high and 22 pounds. $50 at Tractor Supply. Not nearly as big as a car battery. Short cables=better for use with a smaller battery. I also use the gear reduction IMI-101 starter. Spins it over like a CHAMP even at over 10:1 compression. 

https://www.tractorsupply.com/...battery?cm_vc=-10005

https://vwparts.aircooled.net/...hp-1kW-p/imi-101.htm

I agree about weight outside the rear wheels and trying to balance things, but the proximity to the starter motor is why my battery is still in the LR corner. Two foot long battery cables. I'm not a fan of running them all the way up front.

And while you are at it, a few ground straps is a good thing. I have battery to trans, battery to chassis, trans to chassis(2 of them), all secured with star washers in between frame and cable ends. So 4 ground straps all-together. Overkill? Not for me.

And while we're on the subject, NEVER leave any tools near battery posts(Ed!). And ALWAYS disconnect the ground first and connect it up last.

Why? If a wrench slips or touches anything metal on that first or last connection(ground) nothing happens. But if you connect the positive side first or last, EVERYTHING metal can make sparks/weld/explode said battery. This is what I was taught by my Dad, and it has saved me numerous times.

@DannyP

The battery you describe I think was in my Beck Speedster when I purchased, Deka brand labeled for farm equipment I remember, sold at Lowe's and TS. Mine was not that small, I could have used that model but was worried about the lower amps being enough!  The standard size battery was such a pain to get in and out of the Speedster, tucked in the right and the heater hoses ran next to it. To remove, had to slide the battery to the left, under the hood latch barely, under fan belt pulley. Those heater hoses dent so easy, no match for a battery. 

IMG_3718

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