we bought a partially assembled 91 cmc speedster and now need to install battery cable.  talked with vintage speedsters in scottsdale; they have 9’ 4-gauge positive cable.  we’ve measured three times and just aren’t convinced that will be long enough (though they install them all the time).  

can you tell me where you sourced your battery cable/s and what length/s you use?  

thanks much!

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I wouldn't go to VM for that kind of part although I'm sure it would fit.  4 Gauge red copper welding cable is $20 at HomeDepot for 10'.  (10' 2 gauge is $25). You'll need a bolt on battery terminal and copper lug for either end and a couple of rubber grommets where it goes through the fiberglass.  You can crimp and/or solder on the lug for the starter.  

I used a 2-gauge stranded cable sourced from a local place that supplies truck fleets.  IIRC, I bought a 15 foot length with the cable’s starter end lug crimped on by them, then cut  the other end to the proper length at the battery and installed a battery “+” clamp that had a provision for a separate 10 gauge 12 volt line to run my heater (long story there).

The Vintage battery cable should fit a CMC no problem, provided that you use the very same route through the car that Vintage does and the same battery configuration (top or side post and same dimensions - That sort of thing.)

 

WOLFGANG posted:

I wouldn't go to VM for that kind of part although I'm sure it would fit.  4 Gauge red copper welding cable is $20 at HomeDepot for 10'.  (10' 2 gauge is $25). You'll need a bolt on battery terminal and copper lug for either end and a couple of rubber grommets where it goes through the fiberglass.  You can crimp and/or solder on the lug for the starter.  

did you find 10’ was long enough?  

Gordon Nichols posted:

I used a 2-gauge stranded cable sourced from a local place that supplies truck fleets.  IIRC, I bought a 15 foot length with the cable’s starter end lug crimped on by them, then cut  the other end to the proper length at the battery and installed a battery “+” clamp that had a provision for a separate 10 gauge 12 volt line to run my heater (long story there).

The Vintage battery cable should fit a CMC no problem, provided that you use the very same route through the car that Vintage does and the same battery configuration (top or side post and same dimensions - That sort of thing.)

yes, routed same path vc does.  your 2-gauge sounds heavy duty!

I would caution you about the Home Depot “welding cable” - Not that it is bad, just stiff.  They tend to sell “flexible” cable that has quite large strands in it, making it way less flexible than I might like.  The cable used in mid to higher welders is always made up of finer strands that are way more flexible but at a big price premium.

Now, the car’s electrical system really doesn’t care how flexible the cables are, just that they are robust (thick) enough to transmit the amount of current you’ll need to crank over the starter.  4 gauge is good, 2 gauge is better (but more expensive).  

Go have a look at the Home Depot stuff - pull out a length of 3 feet or so and see what you can get for a tight bend radius and ask, will it lend itself to where you want to run it?  Will it fit along the contours of the floor, especially at the back where it curves along the floor and then up through the bulkhead? 

gn

Here's your easy and in expensive fix: Go to a place that specifically sells batteries for cars and trucks. They'll make up what ever you need and shrink warp the ends too while you wait 15 minutes . 10' of # 4 gauge is what I get, cost is about $23 out the door.    Just did a Web search in your area there are a number of places and you might try NAPA Auto Parts too.

I've had cheap jumper cables that are inflexible as Gordon pointed out.  I should have include HD description of the welding cable -  WindyNation power-flex cable is fully annealed pure copper, flexible (high copper strand count), with a tough, solvent resistant EPDM insulation jacket. 

I highly recommend using 2 Gauge Welding Cable.  It is a better conductor and much more pliable than standard battery cable.  Also, use plated copper cable ends and lugs to prevent future corrosion.  In addition to that use solder slugs that are premeasured for the 2 gauge terminals.  To top it off use a 1-1/2" Heavy Dual Wall heat shrink tube to cover the area where the cable insulation meets the terminal splitting the difference for a professional look and maximum corrosion resistance. 

BoB Z - that is the proper professional solution.  Might add a little dielectric grease to either end to protect from corrosion.  A Weller soldering iron gun probably is not sufficient (marginal if so).  I have a big soldering iron I inherited from my dad that is up to the job. A propane torch with right end might work too.

Image result for heavy duty soldering iron

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Guys, my technique is to gently clamp the battery cable end or lug in your vice with the open end up.  Drop your premeasured solder slug or just melt regular electrical solder into the opening with either a propane or mapp torch,  with the solder still liquid insert the end of your cable into the melted soldar and let cool.  Do not forget to slide your heat shrink tubing onto your cable prior to installing tour cable end or lug  you may not be able to get it on afterwards.

Mitch has a better soldering gun than me -  I use a 600 watt and get tired of waiting for it as it takes seemingly forever to heat a 10 or 12 gauge connection enough to flow the solder.  

The trouble with using a torch for soldering 1, 2 or 4 gauge cable ends is that it takes so much heat to heat up the cable's and connector's metal mass to accept a solder flow that the cable's outer sheath (the rubber or vinyl covering) will surely begin to melt, if it doesn't downright burn in the process and pull away from the connector.  Then, you end up with an ugly-looking connection that is best covered with same-color shrink tube to cover up the burnt ugliness.   

Another alternative (but you still have the excess heat problem) is to use cable terminations specifically designed for soldering, like Fusion Links:

https://allbatterysalesandserv...minal-fusion-406304p

I have faced this same problem a number of times, both at work and at home, and have done just what the Auto Industry figured out decades ago:  Crimp it, and then coat the connection with an anti-corrosive spray, like "No Corrode":

https://www.amazon.com/Permate...erosol/dp/B000BOKML2

When I do battery cables, I get a battery, truck or auto electric or HiFi store to crimp the cable ends on for me and I'm done.  They use a pneumatic crimper with jaws made specifically for the lug and wire being crimped and a 2 gauge cable should withstand something around a 600 pound pull (that's how the crimper is tested).  At most, I add some expanded shrink tube to the cable before the ends are crimped on to provide a little more protection at the crimp, but that's it.  I haven't soldered anything bigger than a 10 gauge wire in decades.

I did not crimp the battery end of my most recent cable upgrade because I wanted a special connector that I could not find crimped, but it is a barrel-type I got from a local RV shop that accepts a single 2 gauge and single 10 gauge, similar to this:

https://www.amazon.com/MICTUNI...9720261720&psc=1

Mine has a sleeve or two inside so that when the set-screw is tightened it presses on the sleeve which then presses against the cable, effectively crimping everything together.  Expensive, but it works.

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