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Not to induce thread drift from this thrilling discussion, as I was rebuilding one of the original California IMs, you know with the hibachi grill, I decided that I LIKED the idea of having the reservoir on top of the master cylinder rather than the frunk. That's where I put it. On purpose.

As some of you know, if @ALB is all about putting holes in things, I'm all about making storage space for condiments and other useful things.

Last edited by Michael Pickett

I was here investment broker for a large national firm and we had a rule called  Rule FD. Full Disclosure



I believe when you buy a car for $35,000 you should have full disclosure of the car besides it being shiny..

I’m doing this because I don’t want anybody else to go through what I’ve gone through. Don’t buy the shine.



Is it asking too much do you have a schematic of a fuse system..there’s only six uses.

The driver side door doesn’t rattle at all why because it’s used. The passenger door rattles and rattles and cannot be adjusted anymore because of the location. The best mechanic in Phoenix , Competitive engineering has worked on hundreds of Porsches and VW



















If you’re tired of my posts just don’t read them.



It appears nobody has responded to having a non-visible reservoir.

Yes one of my favorite musicals Is     MAN of La Mancha

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I wasn't going to get into this.

The guy's frustrated. If you pay your money and expect to get a perfect, ready to tour, car then you will likely be frustrated. I was!

I've owned four replicas; built one, traded for one, bought two. The one I was most pleased with was the car I built. I knew where everything was because I put it there.

I doubt that any maker (don't know) test their cars for several hundred miles to see that everything is working as it should. There will always be things to do and you will have to do them or pay someone. Good luck with that. In the end it will come down to learning to work on your prized plastic Porsche or selling it, out of frustration. Most Speedsters get sold with 500-3,000 miles on the odometer because, I suspect, owners were not have a real expatiation of what they were getting into.

Regardless of who built the car It's still a kit. If you're not mechanically inclined you really need another hobby.

40 years ago only the government and General Dynamic's had computers. No internet. No email. You were pretty much on your own. Parts came from the local NAPA.

Free advice is readily available HERE from knowledgeable owners and builders. Lots of prepurchase time spent here would likely have been a great benefit to you. Everyone here will gladly help. We don't tolerate whiners.

Now that you are where you are with the car you only have two options:

1. Sell it now while you can get most of your money back.

2. Work through the issues and enjoy your car. Expect many more challenges.

Best of luck! Really

P.S. my Spyder had the reservoir mounted to the mastercylinder.

Last edited by Jim Gilbert - Madison, Mississippi

Nobody has responded? Did you even read others posts? Here, I'll make it easy for you Don Quixote:

Not to induce thread drift from this thrilling discussion, as I was rebuilding one of the original California IMs, you know with the hibachi grill, I decided that I LIKED the idea of having the reservoir on top of the master cylinder rather than the frunk. That's where I put it. On purpose.





P.S. my Spyder had the reservoir mounted to the master cylinder.

Millions of VW Bugs and their kin had the brake fluid reservoir on top of the master cylinder for many years until they decided to put hoses on it and put it in the trunk.

I'm with Jim above. More research should have been done by you, JPC, before you plunked your money down. Plenty of info has been available right here about all the manufacturers: the good, the bad, and the ugly. As I said before, fix it and be happy, or sell it.

Last edited by DannyP
Gordon also posted some good info.

"Some cars we’ve seen have the brake fluid reservoir mounted in the frunk, which is sometimes subject to leaks at the hose ends, and others have it mounted directly to the top of the master cylinder to eliminate the connecting hoses.  

THAT configuration uses an OEM Volvo reservoir that matches the MC fittings.  Either one works just fine, but one is more accessible than the other.  To check fluid level some time every other year or so on the top-of-the-MC version you need to remove the front, driver’s side wheel for access.  Takes about 4 minutes and you can also do an annual brake line fitting check for leakage at the same time."





We can explain it to you, but we absolutely can not understand it for you.

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