I think I understand.  The bottom of the door was not matching the rocker panel, so you took a very thin pie slice out of the bottom inside of the door, and will fiberglass/epoxy it so that the bottom of the door will be a little bit thinner, thereby matching the rocker panel?

On car shows, they use those smaller air driven cut off wheels quite a bit.  What size compressor do you need to run one of those?  They look handy for cutting fiberglass.   So far, I have used a dremel.

Todd, exactly.

Depends on how much you cut, 6hp 30gal will keep up for a little bit but thats about the minimum. 

I have a big 2 stage Dayton and sometimes it cant keep up. 

If i have to cut a lot of heavier steel i use a Dewalt 4.5in grinder with a cutting wheel.....but it is a dangerious sob!

Yeah, Todd - It's not the pressure your compressor is running, but the volume it's capable of that's important.  Air powered tools - sanders, ratchets, impact guns and cut-off wheels - all take a lot of air to run, but especially sanders, cut-off wheels and die-grinders because they tend to run almost continuously and eat lots of air.

I did all the cutting on my pan when I built it with an air cut-off wheel, but have since seldom used it and go, instead, for one of my electric sets, either two different size angle/cut-off tools or a Dremel (for small stuff).  I just don't have enough air volume in my shop.  But a multi-stage, high-volume compressor with maybe 160 gal capacity in 1 or 2 tanks would be awesome (IF.....I had the room!)

Brock, on that angle grinder/cutoff.....    I have at least half a dozen scars from nicks around my knees when using one to built a whole-house wood-fired furnace years ago (when angle grinders first came out in the 80's).  They work great, but if the damn thing didn't bite me it would set my jeans on fire from the discharge of the wheel.  Sure saves a lot of time and makes accurate cuts, though!

The fit will be awesome. So, I guess the molds and doors sometimes need a lot of work to make the seams align perfectly.  

It reminds me of my 1983 VW GTI, the doors were so bad that nothing was fitting around the door opening and the wind noise was not pleasant.  Eventually the door was taken out and bent  to get it to seal. 

Hey......I sat behind a desk for my first 10 years of work, and then I discovered that by being a project/program manager on large scale projects I could do my job by wandering around and meeting one-on-one with people (Management by Wandering Around - MBWA ) and got away from the desk.  Never looked back after that and continued to learn from everyone working with me to this day.  

"Desk Huggers of the World, UNITE!"

The driver door must have been pulled from the mold to soon or something as the pass door is not nearly as bad.

Gordon,  this is all i do....pretty much all i have ever done is build cars ,trucks and a few bikes.

Ray, i did a 68 f100 a few years ago the driver door was so tweaked i used a 4x4 against the rocker and  a come along  out the other side to twist it back!

Brock B posted:

The driver door must have been pulled from the mold to soon or something as the pass door is not nearly as bad.

Gordon,  this is all i do....pretty much all i have ever done is build cars ,trucks and a few bikes.

Ray, i did a 68 f100 a few years ago the driver door was so tweaked i used a 4x4 against the rocker and  a come along  out the other side to twist it back!

Are you going to keep this car when it's finished and drive it or will it be for sale upon completion?

Bruce, Yes stainless, picked them up yesterday at a local boat salvage place $12.

Yeah with the aircooled engine air flow is very necessary from top out the bottom. Not sure yest how i will seal around the engine to the body.

Brock B posted:

Ray, yes except he used the $150 "R" hinges......its a Outlaw cliche i was going to not do but like the gas fill in the hood it just looks right!

Sometimes internet communication can come across as sarcastic or judgmental because the person's facial expression and tone is not available.  So, the following is not judgmental, but a real question based on real curiosity.  I did not know that exterior lid hinges were typical of an "Outlaw".  I did not know that anybody even used external hinges.  My question is, why?  Why use external hinges?  Do the hidden hinges use up too much room?  Do they not extend far enough?

@Todd M

Todd, I couldn't find a 356 history to vet these hinges, but I think the external hinge applications were a very early 356 hinge configuration. Eventually, they were used in 'Outlaw' applications or race track mode. In race track mode, these hinges would allow the hood to be fully opened without removal (resting on rear glass) for easy access to engine compartment during a race pit stop (as Brock mentioned). 

No offense meant but I have never seen a coupe even my own with external hinges but only on/in outlaws.

I do think they are way more practical to work on the engine though 

EVen more with The hoopty full removal rear end that Corey built.

A full removable or liftable rear end would be awesome to work on any car.

Panhandle Bob posted:
Stan Galat posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

Brock the gaz filler mid hood is not my favourite... just saying 

That's why they make 31 flavors.

I love the external hinges and thru-the-hood gas filler. Next car will have them both.

"Next car"?

You've been holding out on me. What's in the works?

I thought everyone had a β€œnext car”?!!  A guy can dream right?

Jim, after some looking i really thnk most eary race cars didnt use external it was stock or removeable. I think it was started by Rod Emorys dad or maybe the R Goupe......

Anywho....engine lid latched with what may be the OLNY Porsche part on the whole car πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

20190726_155110

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