Where did you mount yours? 

I finally bought the fancy Halon extinguisher, with the plan to mount it in front of the shifter.  However, there's no way that it won't interfere with my right foot.  So it's currently wedged behind the passenger seat next to the old Kidde.

Suggestions will be appreciated.  Also, anyone try one of these passenger seat mounts?

That bracket looks interesting Tom, I have not seen anyone with one but it would be nice to have.  

It got me thinking, a lot of guys are installing the tube fireprevention one in the engine compartment.  It is pretty small,  I wonder if you could one of those under the dash and have sometype of pull activation setup.  I mean are you really going to have time to think to find the extinguisher.    Just thinking out loud. 

I know I've said this before, but it bears repeating: no matter where you mount your extinguisher, it helps with muscle memory if you occasionally practice using it.  Sit in the driver's seat as normal, then go through the steps you will need to do to extinguish an engine fire:

Pull engine lid control;

Open/unlock extinguisher bracket;

Open engine lid, engage extinguisher.  All portable extinguishers I know of have a pin that needs to be pulled prior to activation.

Be aware that you won't be functioning on a "Jeopardy contestant" level if/when you have a fire in your car.  In fact, you may be struck stupid.  When you practice, it will help you consider the process, including how you will keep a hot engine lid open while you engage the extinguisher.

A little practice may persuade you to consider a fixed, automatic device, hopefully one that is UL-approved.  You may even want to keep an old pair of leather gloves near the extinguisher to open the deck lid.

My two cents worth is: I've had a small halon (no messy leftover) extinguisher for several years mounted on the right side (passenger) of the "hump."  It's very easily retrieved by the driver, it doesn't really impinge upon a passenger's leg-room, and the chrome version goes quite well with the interior. Removing it from its mounting hardware every 6 mos. allows me to refresh my "user skills" as well as check the bottle's pressure status. 

 

Blaze cut!

By the time you realize your cars on fire, it's to late. Time yourself driving, pull over and get to the extinguisher, pop the lid get out and see how long that takes...Once gas starts burning and fiber glass start burning, those little fir extinguishers may not be up to the task!

Bill Prout posted:

Blaze cut!

By the time you realize your cars on fire, it's to late. Time yourself driving, pull over and get to the extinguisher, pop the lid get out and see how long that takes...Once gas starts burning and fiber glass start burning, those little fir extinguishers may not be up to the task!

That kinda reminds me of what the old Alaskan grizzly hunt guide told his Lower 48 client, when he showed up with a 7-3/4" .44 Mag revolver...and no rifle: "The first thing you'll wanta do is file off that gun's front sight." The California rube balked at messing up his brand new firearm, and asked why he should do such a stupid thing. The old guide answered: "Because you'll for sure not have enough time to shoot the bear....and without that front sight it might not hurt as bad when the bear shoves that gun up your ass...that's why!"  

I have a 5 lb. Halon bottle. It has a cable pull in the cockpit. 

You all really need to consider all the fresh OXYGEN you add to the fire when you open the engine lid.

I'm with others above who are speaking about the time factor. 'Glass burns FAST!

Keeping it closed gives it a better chance of snuffing out the fire.

DRLA Aux Vent Fire

I've got an extinguisher mounted in the floor, just in front of the driver's seat.

This is my 1-2 45 DLRA Dellorto carb, found during the spring set-up. When I pulled the air cleaner, I thought I was going to throw up. This happened at the Tour 'd Smo 2018 when my ignition pick-up loosened up in the distributor, and gave me two days of fits, spits, and backfires. I did not have the 7 mm socket I needed to get to the stupid thing (due to my science project twin-plug distributor).

I've got burned aluminum spatter all down the number 2 intake runner and into my head. I'm probably done for the year before I ever roll it out of the garage. 

I'm semi-bummed about it, but the car didn't burn down and could have. All things considered, it's a minor bump in the road.

Carry fire suppression gear. 

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Halon found wide usage originally in computer rooms...when computers were big enough to have their own room...1301 was the flavor of choice while containing it within an enclosed space.  Humans were invited to leave rapidly.  Aircraft used a different flavor, I've forgotten its number, primarily for engine fires.   It was considered more of a health hazard than 1301.  Strangely the NFPA at some point dropped its health warnings.  Maybe  you can get past all of the logistical problems already discussed above and use a larger and cheaper ABC extinguisher.  However, using Halon in an enclosed engine compartment with an automatic or manually activated system seems the safer and more effective choice.

Stan Galat posted:

DRLA Aux Vent Fire

I've got an extinguisher mounted in the floor, just in front of the driver's seat.

This is my 1-2 45 DLRA Dellorto carb, found during the spring set-up. When I pulled the air cleaner, I thought I was going to throw up. This happened at the Tour 'd Smo 2018 when my ignition pick-up loosened up in the distributor, and gave me two days of fits, spits, and backfires. I did not have the 7 mm socket I needed to get to the stupid thing (due to my science project twin-plug distributor).

I've got burned aluminum spatter all down the number 2 intake runner and into my head. I'm probably done for the year before I ever roll it out of the garage. 

I'm semi-bummed about it, but the car didn't burn down and could have. All things considered, it's a minor bump in the road.

Carry fire suppression gear. 

YIKES!!  

Sorry to see that, Stan.  Are you sure that you can't just replace the carb and clean out the intake path?  Or will it require removal of the head?

David Stroud posted:

I've got about 60,000 miles of speedster travel. No fires. I'm thinking the odds must be against me now hence this question. What has been the most common cause of catastrophic fires so far ? If you know.... Thanks. 

Backfire. Far and away. Not the "pop pop pop" on deceleration, but if you're farting and spitting on acceleration, it's spitting raw fuel up through the carb.

Like most running problems, the carb where the campfire starts is likely not the cause of the issue. I've often said that 90% of all carburation problems are ignition, but I think I underestimated it. When the engine starts bucking and farting, you need to get to the bottom of it.

Stan:

Toss that 2110 backup engine in and drive. Man, I feel for you with the 2332, mostly because I know you are always seeking nirvana with that engine. But, you can still drive while you repair.... and you didn't catch fire.

Makes me think that I ought to buy a second engine and stick it back in the corner of the garage under a tarp, and another fire extinguisher.

A3AB68D0-D686-4708-A565-E5001437367B57DD927A-3B7C-4047-8162-432F8091B74F60B3E712-3DCC-419E-A4F8-D4AD998253480D95A18D-F4F6-4965-907E-26EEC746CDAFBill Prout posted:

Blaze cut!

By the time you realize your cars on fire, it's to late. Time yourself driving, pull over and get to the extinguisher, pop the lid get out and see how long that takes...Once gas starts burning and fiber glass start burning, those little fir extinguishers may not be up to the task!

I agree !😊

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Panhandle Bob posted:

Stan:

Toss that 2110 backup engine in and drive. Man, I feel for you with the 2332, mostly because I know you are always seeking nirvana with that engine. But, you can still drive while you repair.... and you didn't catch fire.

Makes me think that I ought to buy a second engine and stick it back in the corner of the garage under a tarp, and another fire extinguisher.

I have a spare 1600 that I keep as a back up incase the 2110 goes down. Unfortunately or fortunately my 996 has kept me pre occupied and speedy hasn't been driven in over a year...It needs some loving soon!

 

1982, I dropped my best friend off at the airport the eve of Easter. Instead of driving his bug to his house (late evening) I decided to go home on the way and drop it off in the morning. Got up and started it, big backfire and by the time I saw smoke it was too late.

Jim Kelly posted:

Yeah, Danny, you're right, but keeping the deck lid closed only works if you have a fixed system.  If you are using a portable extinguisher, you will need to open the deck lid to extinguish the fire.

Exactly my point, Jim. Don't even bother with a handheld.

Stan, sorry to hear of your troubles. You're certainly lucky to still have your car after seeing that damage.

@Roy I think Halotron is what you get today, supposedly non-toxic to humans.....

I do fire extinguisher training frequently.  Those little auto and kitchen extinguishers expel quickly and are expired in 15-18 seconds at the most! We always time the demo extinguishers during the training to show how quickly they run out.  Just a heads up.  Quick question I ask at each training... When was the last time you looked at where your kitchen extinguisher is located? (usually buried under the kitchen sink)  And, is the gauge in the green?   Usually dead in the red!

Have a great weekend! 

Jim

  

Honestly, most kitchen fires are grease fires and most extinguishers starve the the flame of air with powder, foam or liquid. Type ABC extinguishers are always a dry powder and the best for grease fires. You don't want to tip the grease pan or splash the flaming grease. Every year on turkey day here in the States, someone sets their house on fire by frying a turkey on the patio too close to the house. Now there is even a K rated extinguisher just for kitchen grease fires!

Manufacturing facilities may have a need for foams to extinguish chemical fires.  Electric fires are tough and the old water filled extinguishers pose a different hazard with them. 

I am just a safety guy and most people do not want to think about a welding blanket taking up room in their kitchen cabinets.  I keep our extinguisher out on the counter where everyone can see it!  More importantly, they can grab it if needed. My home shop & garages have larger extinguishers rated for gasoline, liquid flammables etc....  It is a good idea to look at the gauge to be sure it is still pressurized! 

I was a Driver Trainer for True Value Hardware, we had a guy come and do a parking lot demo on putting out various types of fire. To make a point he lit a flat round pan with a some gas in it, then proceed  to use an extinguisher held too close to the fire forcing some of the gas out of the pan and scorching the side of a brand new Freightliner cab. I grabbed the correct extinguisher and put out THAT fire.

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