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I tried to get to negative one but the adjusters ran out of adjustment. I could go zero or positive only.

Guys have taken the upper arms and kinked them in a press (it'll take 10 or 15 tons of force- they really are tough!), or there are several places that sell the camber adjuster nut thingie with the offset hole.  Being able to run ½ to 1° negative camber makes a difference, even on the street.  Al

I have those adjusters. Not sure why I can't get any neg camber. Maybe the 2" drop spindles have something to do with it?

All the drop spindles I know of are built on the same specs as stock pieces so they shouldn't be the problem, Seth, although it's of course possible yours weren't made properly.  Is it on 1 side or both where you can't dial in any negative camber?

And those are the ones, @Gordon Nichols- they're available from just about everybody.

@edsnova posted:

The stock eccentrics ought to give some negative camber. I'd start checking the upper trailing arms to make sure they're in all the way and the grub screws are centered in the divots.

The stock eccentrics will give you very little negative camber (if any)- there was never intended to be that much adjustability.  Before the offset drilled eccentrics were made (late '80's or very early '90's?) the only option was to put the upper arms in a press if you wanted to deviate from stock alignment specs at all.

Last edited by ALB
@edsnova posted:

Well, I was unaware of these facts when I adjusted and got .5 degree negative on Bridget, using a stock ball joint beam and stock 1969 Beetle parts. Got about the same on the Spyder as well.

I guess that's about the limit then- good to know.  The first time I ran a full degree negative camber on my street car I was told by Don (he owned a VW performance shop) I'd have to have the upper arms bent, so that's what we did.

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