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Alright, solved my pesky overheating problem by finding the paper towel sucked up into the cooling fan so it's time to take things apart and, ahem, fix them.

As those of you who followed my build know, I wanted the distributor space to put an AC compressor, so I installed a Speeduino ECU, crankshaft position sensor and MAP sensor to drive a 2000 Golf electronic ignition coil. It's been working great. 

However, as those of you who live on small volcanic islands where you drive from sea level to over 10,000 feet know, carbs suck at handling big differences in air pressure. So, it's time to go to phase II of the Speeduino saga and replace my trusty (up to 5000 feet above sea level) Kadrons with elevation proof fuel injection.

I looked around at the throttle body options and decided to go with individual throttle body  (ITB) replicas of the Weber IDF with the fuel injectors integrated into the base of the throttle bodies. The other tempting option was to locate the injectors into the intake manifolds, but I wasn't convinced that it would leave enough space for access to the spark plugs etc. CB Performance has some very nice pieces, but they want to sell you the base ITBs and then charge extra for the throttle position sensor, fuel rails, etc. 

I found a set of fully equipped IDF style ITBs from VW Speedshop over in Great Britain that I liked. They came with fuel rails and a throttle position sensor and had lots of options for linkage, etc. 

Paul set me up with a pair of his ITBs and I picked up a set of ITF air cleaners and linkage off of fleabay, as well a 4 regular size Accel 150117 17 lb/hr injectors. I've got Panchito heads so I ordered CB Performance intake manifolds already ported to fit the heads.

The throttle bodies from VW Speed Shop

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The throttle bodies with the fuel injectors and fuel rails installed. Note the throttle position sensor that came preinstalled.

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IDF air filter and manifold installed

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Test fitting to make sure there's room for fuel lines and injectors

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The  next update will cover setting up the high pressure fuel pump, regulator, fuel return and vacuum compensation. 

Cheers!

Mike

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  • IMG_20200628_093731
  • IMG_20200628_100640
Original Post

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Those look nicer than the CB units(I have a set for a future project). I like the huge vacuum port in between the throats, should make for an easy vacuum tap for the MAP sensor. 

So, batch fire for injectors and wasted spark, correct?

The only way to do sequential injection and spark is with a camshaft sensor, which is difficult but possible on a type1.

I'm very interested to see how hard/easy it is to wire the injectors/pump/regulator and ESPECIALLY to program it.

As you did, I did spark first(Megajolt). I am satisfied with the way it runs though, so I think the IDFs are going to stay a while.

@DannyP posted:

So, batch fire for injectors and wasted spark, correct?

The only way to do sequential injection and spark is with a camshaft sensor, which is difficult but possible on a type1.

I'm very interested to see how hard/easy it is to wire the injectors/pump/regulator and ESPECIALLY to program it.

As you did, I did spark first(Megajolt). I am satisfied with the way it runs though, so I think the IDFs are going to stay a while.

Yep, Danny. Batch fire and wasted spark. I'm not convinced that going sequential is worth the difference for what I'm doing. 

@ALB posted:

Very cool, Mike?  Could you explain why you chose Speeduino? (and if you could keep it in layman's terms it would be very much appreciated- I'm not that knowledgeable when it comes to fuel injection)

Short answer is cost. They're very inexpensive and use the same tuning and logging software that I used on the old turbo 911 (Tunerstudio and Megalogviewer). I used a Megasquirt ECU on the turbo and really liked it, but decided to experiment with the newer, cheaper and less capable Speeduino option because the stakes were less worrisome. Plus, if I ran into a dead end at some point, it would be extremely easy to switch over to a Megasquirt unit. So far I'm very happy with Speeduino. If I wanted to bulletproof the setup, I'd go with the Megasquirt. 

Last edited by Michael Pickett
@Stan Galat posted:

I'm leaning pretty hard in this direction (EFI/crank-fire) for the 2234. Those TBs are a nice bit of kit, Michael.

Got a link?

Paul has a lot of options, but I liked this one because I thought it would have the best chance of fitting easily in our engine bays and I just like the IDF looks. I chose the 45mm throats for my 1776 and added the filter adapter conversion option.

I guess a couple of bonuses are that existing IDF linkage, etc work with them and if you decide to go crazy in the future they're easy to adapt to forced induction.

Here's the link:

https://vwspeedshop.com/produc...p;cat=395&page=1

 

@Stan Galat

https://speeduino.com/home/

US sales:

https://wtmtronics.com/

Looks like $150 for an assembled, soldered board or $100 for a board and solder it yourself. You'll need a case for either version. And possibly a board to drive your coil(s)/coilpacks.

I'm seriously going to have to consider this now, it's dirt cheap.

Edit:

I went to the wtmtronics site and it looks like another $50 will get you the case, end plates, Arduino board, and ignition driver. Wire it up, download the firmware, make a loom, and pay for the software. Still epic cheap.

Last edited by DannyP
@DannyP posted:

Stan, you MUST check out their pulley: dry sump size WITH serpentine belt, 3 different alternator pulley diameters, accommodates crank trigger, and has a LARGER bearing so it won't take a crap on you in NC LOL!

https://vwspeedshop.com/produc...p;cat=485&page=1

I think I threw up in my mouth a little.

I paid about that for a couple of custom crank trigger wheels for my rig.

What a fantastic find, @DannyP and especially @Michael Pickett.

@Sacto Mitch posted:

 

Ordinarily, reading about the scope of this project, Mike, I'd say you're going to shoot your eye out, but it looks like you've thought this through.

The only down side I can see is that you're completely missing out on all the fun of idle jets. I guess every new system has its compromises.

 

Heh, I didn't miss out on having a full collection of little brass thingies, er, I mean idle and main jets. I just got tired of changing them!

@DannyP posted:

@Stan Galat

https://speeduino.com/home/

US sales:

https://wtmtronics.com/

Looks like $150 for an assembled, soldered board or $100 for a board and solder it yourself. You'll need a case for either version. And possibly a board to drive your coil(s)/coilpacks.

I'm seriously going to have to consider this now, it's dirt cheap.

Edit:

I went to the wtmtronics site and it looks like another $50 will get you the case, end plates, Arduino board, and ignition driver. Wire it up, download the firmware, make a loom, and pay for the software. Still epic cheap.

Good points, Danny. I bought my Speeduino from Weaver Markel (WTMTronics). I went ahead and let him build my board and it was a top notch assembly job. I did buy the case and Arduino from him, too. I used the Bosch ignition coil 032905106F cross ref 0986221048 - fits 2000 Golf GTI 2.0L engine - uses LS/LT1 terminals. It uses a low amperage 5  volt trigger so the Speeduino can drive it directly (doesn't need the extra driver circuitry).

The tricky part is getting the connections to the board out of the case and into a wiring harness. I'll give an update on what I did a little later. If any of you are itching to buy a Speeduino now, I'd give Weaver a call and get his advice.

Last edited by Michael Pickett

I'm betting Speeduino could be done soup to nuts, injectors, pump, TB, regulator, hoses, sensors, wiring, electronics, coils, trigger wheel, for less than $1000. Worst case, $1500.

In my case, I bartered my CB throttle bodies, injectors, TPS, rails, pump, and regulator(About $4-500 new). I already have a trigger wheel, VR sensor, and coilpack due to my $160 Megajolt install.

I might spend another $300 to buy the brain, case, and build a harness. Add a few sensors: IAT, engine temp, maybe an idle air control valve(and a driver board).

CB's unit is easily almost $3k. Homemade is half the cost, or less.

Heh, I didn't miss out on having a full collection of little brass thingies, er, I mean idle and main jets. I just got tired of changing them!

I have a set each of 40s, 45s, and 48s DLRA Dellortos, as well as a set of 48 tri-jets. I have 4-8 of every idle jet CB makes for Dellortos, and 4 of quite nearly every main, and 6 sets of 4 air correction jets. I'm not very moderate when I get into something.

I'm ready to try EFI, I think.

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