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Yes, this is the one from Shingle Springs. I've had a lot of fun with it.

Everybody asks me if I want to sell it.

Reminds me of one time back in 1987, I saw an old man sitting on a stump playing a banjo. I asked him, "Would you sell me that banjo?"

He looked at me angrily and huffed, "Why would I sell you something that gives me so much pleasure??"

So now I am just like the old man with the banjo.

I don't know.

Have a friend who owns a '52 Chevrolet pickup that was in original condition and converted it into a Rat Rod. He did very little to the paint, just a cleaning and flat clear coat. There are some rubbed thru places, but not that much. It looks like the truck is old and well used...with a custom frame, Corvette running gear. The interior is minimal; as they were.

The cars I've seen where the builder tried to mimic patina just don't look quiet right to me. They always seem to be too distressed. With a little rubbing there would be some shiny places.Anyone who came across a potential $300,000 car in this condition would surely do a restoration.

Maybe if they had a few dents and some bailing wire. I think in the real world you never come across Porsche like this unless it had just come from the barn.

To each his own...I guess I just like shiny

Last edited by Jim Gilbert - Madison, Mississippi

I hope this patina-related question may jog someone's memory about an item from 50 years ago in Road and Track magazine. The last page of many issues was titled PS and had a large car-related black and white photo. Some time in the early 70s I was amused to see in such a photo a subject that I had seen in person many times. During the late sixties I was taking evening classes at U. of Pa. in Philadelphia, and I often parked on the same block as a Porsche Speedster in black primer. It had, taped to one of the side curtains, a message to the effect that "This is not an abandoned car. It is a properly licensed and registered Porsche 356 Speedster, legally parked ...".

The Road and Track photo showed a three-quarter view of the same Speedster and an inset close-up of the message. I would love to see that page again, or even to know exactly what issue it was in so I could pursue a copy.

Anyone old and yet young enough to remember this, and have any leads for me?

I hope this patina-related question may jog someone's memory about an item from 50 years ago in Road and Track magazine. The last page of many issues was titled PS and had a large car-related black and white photo. Some time in the early 70s I was amused to see in such a photo a subject that I had seen in person many times. During the late sixties I was taking evening classes at U. of Pa. in Philadelphia, and I often parked on the same block as a Porsche Speedster in black primer. It had, taped to one of the side curtains, a message to the effect that "This is not an abandoned car. It is a properly licensed and registered Porsche 356 Speedster, legally parked ...".

The Road and Track photo showed a three-quarter view of the same Speedster and an inset close-up of the message. I would love to see that page again, or even to know exactly what issue it was in so I could pursue a copy.

Anyone old and yet young enough to remember this, and have any leads for me?

I have a mostly complete R&T collection going back to the 1950's.  I'll research to see if I have that issue.

@Impala posted:

Funny; remember back then it was probably a used 10-15 year old car. You could probably get them cheap.

My buddy Bill can tell stories all day long about buying speedsters for $300 and thinking he had the world by the tail after selling them for $1K. Buying them three states away and taking a greyhound to pick them up, only to have some misery befall him in the trip. Like driving them mid-winter from Michigan to his home in Florida.

I hope this patina-related question may jog someone's memory about an item from 50 years ago in Road and Track magazine. The last page of many issues was titled PS and had a large car-related black and white photo. Some time in the early 70s I was amused to see in such a photo a subject that I had seen in person many times. During the late sixties I was taking evening classes at U. of Pa. in Philadelphia, and I often parked on the same block as a Porsche Speedster in black primer. It had, taped to one of the side curtains, a message to the effect that "This is not an abandoned car. It is a properly licensed and registered Porsche 356 Speedster, legally parked ...".

The Road and Track photo showed a three-quarter view of the same Speedster and an inset close-up of the message. I would love to see that page again, or even to know exactly what issue it was in so I could pursue a copy.

Anyone old and yet young enough to remember this, and have any leads for me?

PS. One of my favorite parts of the magazine. A favorite was a picture of an XKE with a horribly mounted D-Type wing along with a bunch of other horribly implemented mods. The caption was “After years of research, Ed finally discovered an XKE that repels women.”



This is my current favorite:

Caption: “Good tires,” Bob said, casually lighting a cigarette, “But certainly not great tires.

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  • mceclip0

I bought a '62 Porsche  356 Karmann Knotchback for $300.  (Quite rare but unloved). It ran well but needed brakes and a driver's floor (Rust  too in lower doors and the longitudinals).  This was 1976.  Was in luck when someone knocked STOP sign down at end of my street! It had the old VW chrome over rider bumpers.  I flipped it for $1700 via Panorama. Guy flew in with a buddy and drove it from Hampton VA to Ohio.

Even my Miata's high performance OEM summer tires come with a warning of driving below 40 degrees.  The rubber gets rock hard and can actually crack.

I'd wrap my Speedster in the Joplin car's art work! I did check mine out yesterday and it is still in my barn.

Last edited by WOLFGANG
@WOLFGANG posted:

I'd wrap my Speedster in the Joplin car's art work! I did check mine out yesterday and it is still in my barn.

Me, too.

I saw that car IRL once. I went to Storz Garage in Denver to buy some parts for my 912 and it was there. Apparently Janis’ sister lived in Boulder and she brought it in to get it running prior to displaying it at the R&R Hall of Fame.

(I haven’t seen it, personally, but I understand her car was later sold and the museum has a replica now has a replica on display)

Last edited by dlearl476

You know how much @DannyP and @Chris MacDonald hate the "James Dean Spyder" thing? How their dislike for it has moved beyond a scale where they can even explain it to guys who don't really care one way or another? Where they start to foam at the mouth a bit when somebody creates (yet another) "130/Little Bastard"? clone?

That's how much I dislike the Janis Joplin 356C and all the re-pops it has spawned. Every pot has a lid, I suppose - but what started out as an acid-fueled and ironic defacing of a status automobile, has somehow become a desirable object for men of a certain age. Remove Ms Joplin from the equation and it would easily be mistaken for a vandalized car.

I really, really hate it. That thing fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down. Resale value aside, I'd rather own an electric car than that abomination.

joplin abomination

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Last edited by Stan Galat
@Stan Galat posted:

You know how much @DannyP and @Chris MacDonald hate the "James Dean Spyder" thing? How their dislike for it has moved beyond a scale where they can even explain it to guys who don't really care one way or another? Where they start to foam at the mouth a bit when somebody creates (yet another) "130/Little Bastard"? clone?

That's how much I dislike the Janis Joplin 356C and all the re-pops it has spawned. Every pot has a lid, I suppose - but what started out as an acid-fueled and ironic defacing of a status automobile, has somehow become a desirable object for men of a certain age. Remove Ms Joplin from the equation and it would easily be mistaken for a vandalized car.

I really, really hate it. That thing fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down. Resale value aside, I'd rather own an electric car than that abomination.

joplin abomination

Remember; it’s a product of the time and circumstances; when almost everybody were on something and dropped out. As an aside, I love Janis’ musical talent...😉

@Stan Galat posted:

You know how much @DannyP and @Chris MacDonald hate the "James Dean Spyder" thing? How their dislike for it has moved beyond a scale where they can even explain it to guys who don't really care one way or another? Where they start to foam at the mouth a bit when somebody creates (yet another) "130/Little Bastard"? clone?

That's how much I dislike the Janis Joplin 356C and all the re-pops it has spawned. Every pot has a lid, I suppose - but what started out as an acid-fueled and ironic defacing of a status automobile, has somehow become a desirable object for men of a certain age. Remove Ms Joplin from the equation and it would easily be mistaken for a vandalized car.

I really, really hate it. That thing fell out of the ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down. Resale value aside, I'd rather own an electric car than that abomination.

joplin abomination

Man, and I thought I had a bad case of “Get off My Lawn” syndrome.

FWIW, I feel the same way about putting Subaru motors in Porsche replicas. Don’t like “fiddling with carbs?” Need AC? Stereo? Heated massage seats? Cup holders? Buy a friggin’ Toyota. Or a Subaru.

And don’t get me started on fauxtina  

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