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I posted about this on page 2 of Kelly's stripped wheel hub 4 pager:

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<div class="quote-header"><a href="https://www.speedsterowners.com/member/dannyp" data-mentioned-member-oid="2698552241872033">@DannyP</a> posted:</div>
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<p>Every Tuesday I get an email from Harbor Freight for "New Tool Tuesday".</p>
<p>This week featured Quinn torque gauges/adapters. These go between your socket and ratchet/breaker bar and indicate actual torque, like a socket extension. They are available in 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" drive.</p>
<p>The biggest one is of interest to me, it registers to 750 ft. lbs. The 1/2 inch drive only goes to 250, which explains why I've broken MANY 1/2" breaker bars, even Snap-On.</p>
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@DannyP posted:

Ok, don't shoot me, I don't know how to properly use the source code feature...

  • Go to the post you want to quote or copy
  • Click, "quote"
  • Edit the quote box in your reply to get it down to what you want
  • Click the source code button
  • Highlight everything you see
  • Control X to cut it and remember it in your clipboard
  • Click OK to return to the (now empty) reply box
  • Type what you want, where you want it (in a different thread or a PM, if you want - anywhere on the site)
  • Push the source code button again in your new reply
  • Paste what you want to quote in there, where you want it
  • Click OK, continue to edit your post
  • Post the reply
Last edited by Stan Galat

There have been little items called strainserts around for ages.  They are actually the bolt itself, fitted with a small strain gage.  All us engineer dweebs have been using such stuff for decades. I'll bet even the Bureau of Standards even has a certified gizmo similar (costing about the same number, but add two decimal points you could buy to calibrate whatever you might have. They need to be hooked up to electronics to get a reading, and I believe this cool little number is just all of that in a wee small box.  Needs batteries, i'm supposing. there is a Harbor Freight nearby, I should check it out.  Great tip.

@Stan Galat posted:
  • Go to the post you want to quote or copy
  • Click, "quote"
  • Edit the quote box in your reply to get it down to what you want
  • Click the source code button
  • Highlight everything you see
  • Control X to cut it and remember it in your clipboard
  • Click OK to return to the (now empty) reply box
  • Type what you want, where you want it (in a different thread or a PM, if you want - anywhere on the site)
  • Push the source code button again in your new reply
  • Paste what you want to quote in there, where you want it
  • Click OK, continue to edit your post
  • Post the reply

Oooooor...

Drag the cursor over the text you want with the right button down to highlight.  Press control-C (cut).  Place the cursor is your input window where you want the text to go.  Press control-V (paste).  Done.

Thanks for the source code tips, gentleman. I always like to learn something new.

.........."You'll not see nothing like the mighty Quinn" :~)

I bought the Quinn mechanics tool set. It was $400 or so, and very complete. Picked up a rubber mallet, a couple hammers, and a plier set. Now you have a pretty complete set for not a lot of dough. I added all the VW special tools, my tune-up box(tach/dwell/timing light etc.) and my new 1/2" drive electric impact.

The sheer completeness of the socket and bit selection is pretty amazing, not to mention the combination wrenches both standard and ratcheting. All in metric and standard.

The quality is better than the latest Craftsman, Husky, or Kobalt, but not quite Snap-On.

I also bought the 5 drawer rolling cart(on sale) and have that ratchet strapped to a e-track on the trailer wall. It's PERFECT for a trackside FV tool kit.

Danny P wrote: "The quality is better than the latest Craftsman, Husky, or Kobalt, but not quite Snap-On."

But then, both Snap-On and Mac are something like 4X+ the cost of any of those others for no where near 4X the quality these days.  Snap-On is popular with some businesses that can write off their tool expenses, but they're too expensive for most hobbyists who would actually use them.

I've been a little dismayed to see the tools offered in the big box stores dwindling in recent years.  You're forced to look and order online for a shipping fee or a "Ship-to-store" a few days later but if you head out to buy something for use that day it's usually not in stock.  Difficult Tool Times we live in (with apologies to Tim Allen!)

Ok, let's see how Lane's tip works:

Every Tuesday I get an email from Harbor Freight for "New Tool Tuesday".

"This week featured Quinn torque gauges/adapters. These go between your socket and ratchet/breaker bar and indicate actual torque, like a socket extension. They are available in 3/8", 1/2", and 3/4" drive.

The biggest one is of interest to me, it registers to 750 ft. lbs. The 1/2 inch drive only goes to 250, which explains why I've broken MANY 1/2" breaker bars, even Snap-On."

Ok, it works, but that's just simple cut and paste. I added the quotation marks.

Stan's method allows the "reply with quote" feature to be in a little box AND be moved to an entirely different thread.

So Lane "IT-man" Anderson, not so much the same.

Last edited by DannyP

Oooooor...

Drag the cursor over the text you want with the right button down to highlight.  Press control-C (cut).  Place the cursor is your input window where you want the text to go.  Press control-V (paste).  Done.

That's just cut-n-paste. You get no gray box when you do that. I like the gray box, even when I'm quoting something from another thread.

More generally, I'm always curious that more people don't use the "reply with quote" feature when they're quoting in the same thread.

This serves several functions - 1) it's far easier to read, and to instantly understand what is going on with the reply - to know specifically what's being referenced. 2) it automatically alerts the original poster that he's being quoted, and alerts him to the thread. It shows up as an Alert the next time the quoted user logs into the site. It's easier than cut-n-paste, and then doing the whole "@username" hyperlink thing. 3) It breaks up the length of text. I'm super-guilty of this, but if something gets to be 4 paragraphs long without a picture or quote box, or something to break up the text - nobody's going to read it all.

Last edited by Stan Galat

Regarding tools - All the action is in the building trades tools. The cordless stuff is otherworldly in variety and quality. Everything is made for the mobile tradesman, and everything in that world is much, much better than it used to be. Drive-bits, cordless pin-guns, everything. It's great and getting better by the day. Go to a construction jobsite and look for a corded tool - it'll be a rotary hammer. Everything else is cordless. The cordless framing gun is coming. It might take a while, but it'll come.

As mentioned, mechanic's tools are becoming less and less a thing, as less and less people actually work on machines. Nobody I know (who isn't a professional dealership mechanic) buys Snap-On or Mac hand tools because (as Gordon correctly points out) they cost 4-5 x what a set of Craftsman or Kobalt tools does, and they don't last 4-5x as long.

I've got 2 of the biggest socket/combination wrench sets Craftsman makes, but I only bought them because I like to have all of the wrenches and sockets of the same make, if possible. Out on the trucks, I don't care - because we lose them there, and we piece together sets from other incomplete sets in the shop. I do the same thing with my Speedster travel-tools.

It's been a long, long time since I broke a socket or combination wrench from any manufacturer, though. Ratchets, yes - but I've always been doing something outside design when they broke. The days of rebuilding them are over, but I replace them with 3 or 4 of the best teardrop ratchet I can find for a normal price. Stanley made one that was excellent quality, before they became NLA. I like to keep sockets of the same brand, but my theory on ratchets is that I've never opened the socket drawer and thought - I'm so glad I only have one 3/8 drive ratchet.

Like most things, more is more. More ratchets is a great thing.

I end up with a lot of incomplete wrench/socket sets, because when you lose tools out on the truck, and the choice is to buy a single 5/8" combination wrench from Ace for $12 or a whole set from HF for $20, the choice isn't hard. I like saving the incomplete sets for "special" tools - you know, the 13 mm combination wrench ground down because it didn't fit in a certain spot unless you ruined a wrench to do it. That fella' is definitely a Pittsburg HF wrench from an incomplete $19.99 set (the one missing the 10 mm or the 1/2").

Running counter to most guys' thinking - I'm glad/sad that HF is moving upscale. In one way, it's nice that they've got some stuff approaching professional level, but you can't buy individual sockets and wrenches, so I wonder what you're supposed to do when the 10mm socket goes missing. OTOH, the world needs crappy tools, like the sets that Japanese motorcycles used to supply or what HF used to be - super-cheap throwaways for places where the quality really doesn't matter.

The thing I feel most strongly about is keeping tools. Giving them away or selling them is just foolish. How is a man supposed to fix or do anything at all manly without tools?

Last edited by Stan Galat

Some thoughts on @Stan Galat's piece:

Cordless framing guns (gas driven) have been around for a long time from Passload.  That's what they all had when they built my current 2-car garage 15 years ago.  Electric versions are starting to appear, too.  

https://www.paslode.com/

Watch for them on "This Old House" as Tommy Silva and his teams always seem to have the latest tools out there, as subtle advertising from the makers who provide them (usually free) to the show.

I've noticed, especially with Craftsman ratchets - and I'm talking Sears stores, here (Lowe's may be different) - That if you have the old style with the bar on the back to change direction (which was rebuildable when they still offered rebuild kits) and it finally wears out, if you take it in to get a new one under the lifetime warranty they give you a new one that's one grade lower in quality (and not rebuildable), like the finger-flipper style with a poorer gear set inside.

Re- More is more:  When we had two homes 1,000 miles apart, I would bring my Go-To tool box with me - A three drawer box, stuffed to the gills, but eventually had I got a stand up tool chest when they went on sale at Lowes or HD.  When we went back to one home I combined everything so I not only have a stand-up chest each for Metric and English, but there are several duplicates of everything in both.  More is more.  You can't beat that.

I still have the 7/16" X 1/2" dual box wrench that I put a 90 bend in to get at the distributor clamp bolt on a GMC 350 V8 over 50 years ago.  Sacrificed a wrench for the greater good but made life a lot easier.

Harbor Freight saw a hole opening up in the market when Craftsman and Stanley and others started outsourcing their tools to Asia about ten years ago.  As quality went down the demand for better quality tools increased.  Craftsman et al shouldn't have let their quality slip in the first place, but the demand has been decreasing for tools, in general but especially for automotive-style tools, for the past decade.  I believe that HF saw the hole and is beginning to fill it.

@Stan Galat posted:

As mentioned, mechanic's tools are becoming less and less a thing, as less and less people actually work on machines.

Running counter to most guys' thinking - I'm glad/sad that HF is moving upscale. In one way, it's nice that they've got some stuff approaching professional level

How is a man supposed to fix or do anything at all manly without tools?

Sage thoughts. Since my other car is an EV, I've had to build my EV tool kit using vintage Harbor Freight tools (note to sensitive souls, this is an attempt to be funny and not an attempt to kick off a howling round of EV bashing).PXL_20221119_180045368

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@Gordon Nichols - I know all about Paslode guns - I've got one. It costs a fortune to shoot those nails.

I'm talking about a cordless (meaning "battery", not just that it has no cord) framing guns. I know there are some out there, but none that have the power and durability of a Milwaukee worm-gear skill saw (to reference a ubiquitous framing tool).

Last edited by Stan Galat

I bought a red kit from Milwaukee, M12 and it came with a rachet, I used it a few times works pretty well, but then I tried the 4 seting m12 fuel 1/4 inch driver and that is a handyman tool that senses and self adjusts for torque and putting in sheet metal screws without stripping them.

All the tools seem to be inferior quality these days for sure and years ago I bought one of these digital torque thingies they work but the click type is nicer to use. You can use this to check your click TW.



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  • mceclip0

wrt the torque adapter from HF, it is only an in-store purchase.  Listed on website for about $25 -- cheap -- but no store near me has one.  I found similar item by Delco (??) on Amazon, I think, many more $$ but looks like the real deal.  Might be a handy tool.  I have never sprung for one of those gazillion piece tool sets with every socket or wrench known to man.  I Just buy what I need sorta when I need it.  After about 50 years of that, I have a lot of tools, and you'd think I'd have all I need.  But no . . . seems I'm always looking for one more this or that.  In all that time I think I broke one 3/8 drive ratchet (it was seriously abused) and split out one spark plug socket.  Along the way I came to really appreciate 6 point sockets vs the more ubiquitous 12 pt, and now have many of each.

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