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@barncobob my car started life in the north hollywood "hood" and was one of the 1st completed cars to leave the san marcos "TAJ MAHAL"....to be fair, his move south complicated my build time ALOT...but the overall experience of the JPS saga left a very un-needed FOUL taste in my mouth...after some $$$ on MY DIME and  time sorting out....(of JPS shortcuts and cost cutting & non attention to obvious details)...not to mention a few cases of  verbal abuse & terrible business dealings....my car is a very nice example....but, nearly threw in the towel a few times......as many know, this man's REPUTATION presides him....just more WORDS to the WISE

@DannyP posted:

All I have to do is take one look at the connectors and vinyl tape wrap used in that wiring-in-progress Suby build. It makes me want to throw up.

Here's the same engine in a Vintage Motorcars build.  I took this shot on a shop visit there in 2019.  Greg didn't spend much money on his office because he doesn't spend much time in it.  He's out on the floor.  The building is humble, but the builds are great.

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  • mceclip0

@Stan Galat i agree....me tooP_20181222_075439 [1).....my paint and interior is stunning...here's another JPS "money- shot".... my car was one of the nicest recent cars (2 years old)....but putting up with a intermittently psychotic angry man.....(i never knew from visit to visit which person was living in his head DR JEKYLL or MR HYDE) that treats his customers with utter DISTAIN .....well, IMHO....he really should do something else for a living

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  • P_20181222_075439 (1)

Bruce,

The stock intake points toward the front of the car. Vintage puts a hole in the back engine compartment wall and that lets the intake hose attach directly to the throttle body.  It then runs through it in a gentle arc before re-entering the engine compartment through another hole.  

JPS uses a 180 degree fitting bolted onto the throttle body to point the inlet toward the rear of the car. The JPS solution is less efficient from an air-flow point of view (some of the 180* fitting available have sharp angles at the welds) and it looks a little cobbled up, but it cuts way down on assembly labor.

Michael

I find it interesting that as of recently the classic body JPS Speedsters are essentially the original Beck design, and I believe they are built at the old Chamonix facility in Brazil.  I guess the Brazilians had to find another US distribution arm when Beck broke off with them.  Beck moved production to Indiana to better control quality and have now completely changed the frame desig.  I would liken the current classic JPS cars to my older (2006) Beck.  I don't know how much of the finishing work (wiring/paint/upholstery) is now done in Brazil.

@Lane Anderson  It 's interesting what you say about the Chamonix facility in Brazil, and its relationship to Beck.

There was a post here recently about Bugeye Sprites, and the fact that the Bugeye Guy is now selling Speedsters.  I checked it out, and he has a  silver 2009 Beck speedster for sale that he says is registered as a 1957 Charmonix (his spelling).

https://www.bugeyeguy.com/2020...-speedster-for-sale/

I was confused how that could be, but  your post help clarify it a little.

Last edited by Bob: IM S6

I visited JPS and toured their facility in San Marcos (I'm 30 minutes away by Mountain Bike) when I was in the market for a Speedster a few years ago. I met both Patrick and John. Patrick was pleasant. Bob was nice and engaging. When I left JPS, Bob made a comment how the car ('69 912) I was driving did not have the correct factory OEM wheels. I told him that I had the original dealer sticker and Kardex that documented the option and build including the cost for the 6x15 Deep Six Fuch alloy wheels - but that wasn't enough to change John's mind and he didn't want to listen any further. I didn't buy anything from JPS. I will say that all the cars in the shop had great paint and interior however.

Last edited by ZFNHSN

Bruce,

The stock intake points toward the front of the car. Vintage puts a hole in the back engine compartment wall and that lets the intake hose attach directly to the throttle body.  It then runs through it in a gentle arc before re-entering the engine compartment through another hole.  

JPS uses a 180 degree fitting bolted onto the throttle body to point the inlet toward the rear of the car. The JPS solution is less efficient from an air-flow point of view (some of the 180* fitting available have sharp angles at the welds) and it looks a little cobbled up, but it cuts way down on assembly labor.

Michael

It is my observation that one can simply turn the intake manifold 180 degrees (clockwise or counter, doesn't matter!) and it will bolt right up pointing the throttle body in the opposite direction of stock. The fuel lines are then wrong then but no biggie. The real trouble is you now have to figure out where else to mount the alternator. Also not too big a deal though, particularly if the AC isn't going to be used.

They also sell a wedge-shaped spacer to allow clearance to the alternator in its stock location.

Last edited by edsnova
@edsnova posted:

It is my observation that one can simply turn the intake manifold 180 degrees (clockwise or counter, doesn't matter!) and it will bolt right up pointing the throttle body in the opposite direction of stock. The fuel lines are then wrong then but no biggie. The real trouble is you now have to figure out where else to mount the alternator. Also not too big a deal though, particularly if the AC isn't going to be used.

I think the rationalization runs like this:

A) Slap on a $10 elbow (works OK, kinda cobby looking, can't see it most of the time)

or

B) Rotate intake 180 degrees, fabricate throttle hook up, remount alternator, and re-plumb fuel lines (works great, looks great, can't see it most of the time)

If you only want to milk the cow once choose A.   You, Sir Edward of Metal-Work, Pounder-of-Thumbs, Coverer-of-Speedster-Cockpits, care about things.  You would choose B every time.  That's why there's a long list people that would like to share a beer with you.   Bookmaker's odds say John's list is really short.

So I wasn't imagining things. The manifold can be switched 180 degrees !  Very clever and thoughtful engineering. I also see that there are several alternator and A/C compressor brackets. I guess that's why.  I keep forgetting that this style of engine has been around for a lot of years. New to me though. I never was interested to look at one up close until now. Truly amazing !...........Bruce

@tank the word "professional" & JPS sure don't seem to go together IMHO....i guess it depends on the day if he's DR. JEKYLL or Mr. HYDE...you say "well into " & "so far ,so good"...it will be interesting to see if your opinion changes during the process...those of us that know have experience that you may not be used to...as of yet....feel free to update, but maybe better not to.... if you upset him...all bets are off potentially....and that's not an exaggeration

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