Brian:

Seats for thought:   if you are doing an outlaw car I would suggest speedster seats instead of comfort.  That will give you more of the look that is outlaw. 

There are lots of unique things that make up an outlaw  so feel free to call with any questions.

Also square weave is the way to go.. I have it and it cleans up well and always looks great.

Tebs

 

Teby S posted:

Brian:

Seats for thought:   if you are doing an outlaw car I would suggest speedster seats instead of comfort.  That will give you more of the look that is outlaw. 

There are lots of unique things that make up an outlaw  so feel free to call with any questions.

Also square weave is the way to go.. I have it and it cleans up well and always looks great.

Tebs

 

I have square weave in my Speedster, so it will be a must in the Coupe. I'll have to get the the CEO (aka wifey) onboard with the speedster seats - her first thought was comfort seats in the coupe...

On this day, September 7th 2017, the start of an outlaw build - Whitewalker - begins its journey from nothingness to greatness! The madness continues!

A very BIG and HUGE thank you to Greg at Vintage Motorcars. He took the time tonight (keep in mind he has a family) to deliver the chassis to my house. I recently sold my truck and didn't have means to get the chassis home and he was willing to make the trip.

Greg also spent time listening to my vision of how Whitewalker will turn out. Some ideas will require some fabrication. I even proposed a new engine; I doubt anyone can guess. I've got a little more analysis to do, but I definitely got an eyebrow raise from Greg (MusbJim knows - so he doesn't count if he answers...)  

Time to get to work!!!

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I wonder if the dash can be changed to one that is from an A series with the key on the left ... personally that is my favourite.  I would make sure to have a lot of insulation in the coupe if you want to be in a comfortable car without too much noise.

IaM-Ray posted:

I wonder if the dash can be changed to one that is from an A series with the key on the left ... personally that is my favourite.  I would make sure to have a lot of insulation in the coupe if you want to be in a comfortable car without too much noise.

I believe Greg's coupe does have the key on the left. Either way, I do plan to have a left side key on this build.

It will have a LOT of insulation - similar to how did my Speedster build...

Brian what I was referring to was the 58 style or older dash with large radio area compared to the 59A which has the standard 356 speedster dash look.

IaM-Ray posted:

Brian what I was referring to was the 58 style or older dash with large radio area compared to the 59A which has the standard 356 speedster dash look.

Got it. If I recall, his mold he uses is from a 1955 Pre A Coupe. The pics on page one of the continental (forest green) matches his mold. I'll confirm, but I'm almost certain its a 1955 Pre A...IMG_9946IMG_9948

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Brian... I like the pre 55 dash but I do prefer the 59A style ... so if Greg had a dash from a 59 era it would allow some flexibility for those who want the 59 era look.  Also the 55 dash is not so outlaw looking IMO. ... I love a coupe though so I will look forward to seeing it built.  

IaM-Ray posted:

Brian... I like the pre 55 dash but I do prefer the 59A style ... so if Greg had a dash from a 59 era it would allow some flexibility for those who want the 59 era look.  Also the 55 dash is not so outlaw looking IMO. ... I love a coupe though so I will look forward to seeing it built.  

I see what you mean. They both look great. I kind of like the idea of not doing the same 3 gauge style since I have that on my Speedster... I could change my mind once I get to the body decisions.

I am firm on not having bumpers, trim, wind shield wipers (I'm going to try and pull of  the on wiper from the roof look), louvered rear deck lid, custom hinges (on top versus inside) of the rear deck lid and frunk (Greg and I briefly brainstormed the idea)...

No guesses on the engine?!? I do have experience working on it and heavily modifying it for a good amount of power...

Here's a few pics of my build/modifications on the engine I'm thinking of putting in Whitewalker.

This was one of my daily drivers several years ago.

Wait for it... wait for it...

It's an FA20 engine with a Jackson Racing Supercharger (Rotrex) kit. EcuTek tuned on 91 oct. CARB legal too. This little Scion (now Toyota 86) was a beast to drive! Toyota and Subaru got together and made this. It's basically a Subaru engine. Toyota only did minor stuff to it during the collaboration. It's smaller in size then the EJ20 (I believe). Stock puts out about 205hp. With the C38 kit, I was putting out about 285hp and 216tq on 91 CA oct (which is piss gas)..

I still need to figure some stuff out, specifically, engine management and if it can be stand alone... etc... The FA20 engines are SUPER easy to work on and pretty darn reliable IMO. Plus, I get Toyota parts at company cost so that helps...

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Here is more info on the supercharger kit. I know both Oscar and Oscar Jr. Really nice guys and they are a short drive away.

https://jacksonracing.com

Details about the Rotrex system they use:

https://jacksonracing.com/rotrex-technology/

I'll likely have to get the BRZ version of the FA20 as I believe the adapter plate will work (similar to the EJ20/EJ25 adapter folks use).

I still have a sh@# ton of research to do. It is just a vision at this point...

Stan Galat posted:

I made a stupid comment before I looked at this closely. That's pretty sweet, Longfella.

Good thing I didn't reply to the comment and keep it forever in the SOC forum. I got your back  

*LongFella posted:
Stan Galat posted:

I made a stupid comment before I looked at this closely. That's pretty sweet, Longfella.

Good thing I didn't reply to the comment and keep it forever in the SOC forum. I got your back  

Thanks, 'ol buddy. I'm getting so.. so...

old.

First round of sanding and sealing has started. I told my wifey how much easier the second build is going to be. I've got just a small single build of experience, but I'm sure I can do this second one a LOT more efficiently IMG_9351

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My second build zipped along a lot faster than the first, and didn't have the problems of the first, mostly because of this forum helping me along.

More Cost effective?   Naaaah.   Fewer mistakes, though, so maybe that helped to contain costs.  

Gordon Nichols posted:

My second build zipped along a lot faster than the first, and didn't have the problems of the first, mostly because of this forum helping me along.

More Cost effective?   Naaaah.   Fewer mistakes, though, so maybe that helped to contain costs.  

He should be able to use all the same tools he bought during the first build, so I'd say t MIGHT be more cost effective. LOL 

Robert M posted:
Gordon Nichols posted:

My second build zipped along a lot faster than the first, and didn't have the problems of the first, mostly because of this forum helping me along.

More Cost effective?   Naaaah.   Fewer mistakes, though, so maybe that helped to contain costs.  

He should be able to use all the same tools he bought during the first build, so I'd say t MIGHT be more cost effective. LOL 

That will be the big savings spot - tools. I have all that I need now to do another build AND a few extra parts I can use on this build.

Don't kid yourself, Brian; you'll do more yourself and buy more tools. It never ends. I've been playing with VW stuff for over 40 years, have a full stand up tool box, recently put a smaller one on top and I'm starting to think a small metal lathe would be neat and and I could do so much with a milling table (do you know how easy it is to drill holes in round things with a rotary fixture? I have no idea what one costs, but it's really cool!). The question is where to put them; I could move the wife's car out of the garage, but I do like being married. What to do...

 Just make sure the tool box is big enough.

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Bottom side sanded and sealed. Flipped him over and put a THICK layer of rhino liner on the top. Once cured, I'll flip him over and do the bottom. If I recall, just this process took me a month to do. I got it done in a weekend with time to drink beer and sit in our spa now

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Stan Galat posted:

Deep pans?

Not sure. I believe Greg mentioned the donor was a 72' and he added new "thicker" Brazilian pans. He also ensured everything was straight and aligned. The pans look like what I have on my Speedster...

Getting back to the dash, I can provide you with a detailed, dimensioned illustration of a gen-u-ine '55 Pre-A dash.  Same one that Bob Carley, Manny in Uganda and Gary in South Africa used (and someone in Scotland, to, but I can't remember his name).  

Send me a PM if you want it.

If surface was prep'd/treated properly (degreased/metal prep) POR-15 would be more effective at stopping and preventing rust.  It's a rust encapsulator.  POR-15 takes an added top coat to protect it from UV rays.  Bedliner is effective at preventing nicks from stone damage and since it is thick - it cuts down on road noise but it is heavy.  

I used rubberized undercoating on a then new 1972 Porsche 914.  It ended up trapping water and probably causing more rust than it prevented (I lived in NJ and No. VA). The rubberized coating separated from the metal and caused air pockets.  In hind site, I did no prep other than ensure it was clean of mud/dirt.  Hopefully bedliner doesn't do the same - guess prep (de-greasing) is key.

Bedliner or rubberized under coating would be good in wheel wells where stones get thrown up as it would prevent spider cracks of fiberglass and also deaden sound (but I doubt the sound deadening would be noticeable).

The bed liner sure looks nice though!

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