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WOLFGANG posted:

If surface was prep'd/treated properly (degreased/metal prep) POR-15 would be more effective at stopping and preventing rust.  It's a rust encapsulator.  POR-15 takes an added top coat to protect it from UV rays.  Bedliner is effective at preventing nicks from stone damage and since it is thick - it cuts down on road noise but it is heavy.  

I used rubberized undercoating on a then new 1972 Porsche 914.  It ended up trapping water and probably causing more rust than it prevented (I lived in NJ and No. VA). The rubberized coating separated from the metal and caused air pockets.  In hind site, I did no prep other than ensure it was clean of mud/dirt.  Hopefully bedliner doesn't do the same - guess prep (de-greasing) is key.

Bedliner or rubberized under coating would be good in wheel wells where stones get thrown up as it would prevent spider cracks of fiberglass and also deaden sound (but I doubt the sound deadening would be noticeable).

The bed liner sure looks nice though!

It is all in the prep...

Prior to laying the bed liner down, the surface was completely sanded (using different grits). I removed everything (to almost bare metal in some spots). Next, I cleaned the service and degreased everything with a heavy cleaning solution. Lastly, I painted the service using a rest prevention paint. After the paint cured, I applied the bed liner material.

In essence, I created a rust proof and sound deadened chassis with added weight.

What made this time so much easier then last, I have a 30 gallon compressor and air tools. It made the process a BREEZE compared to hand sanding and painting...

There's a world of difference between ruberized undercoating and truck bed liner.

Properly applied, bed liner provides scratch protection no paint (no matter how good) can ever hope to match. It's thickness and ruggedness encapsulates better than paint as well. The only reason to paint under it is to cover any spots that might be missed in the application of the liner. 

Sand, clean, paint with rust reforming primer, and coat with bed liner, and it'll last way longer than any of us will.

Last edited by Stan Galat

I will be following your build LONGFELLA. The outlaw theme can come across in various ways, and that personalization is what makes it yours.

I am going outlaw coupe also (having it built), and my Idea is race car for outlaw. Not full slammed, but low-ish. I hope to gas it through bumps. My CEO is also on board as she rarely will get on my motorcycle, so I have to have certain creature comforts. Four of which come to mind right off the top of my head... Heat & a/c (attainable with Subie power). Quiet exhaust - noise is fatigue (at least for the wife). Quiet and fast. And seats with head rests, for that inevitable snooze/nod on the way home after a long day. There are a couple of seats with the outlaw-ish look with headrests. Keep the seats low. Other than that, no frills.

Interesting motor choice you have in mind. Different is good. Excess headaches to achieve are not. Enjoy the build!

If you’re building a coupe, you may also want to consider (1.) a really quiet exhaust system (I mean, really quiet) and (2.) an air intake plenum for the carbs or throttle body to reduce the pulsed intake noise (which sounds a lot like exhaust noise) which is just behind the rear seats.  The inside of a coupe body is like sitting in a phone booth and the noise level in there can get pretty loud.  

Jim Kelly posted:

As a coupe owner, I can attest that it's not hard at all to make the interior quiet, even with Tiger's exhaust and a mid-engine Subi turbo.  Just use a quality sound deadener and follow instructions.  After all, if Specialty Auto Sports can make a quiet coupe, how hard can it be?

Yes follow our directions, and it will all go right   

 

I have a mild 2026 cc stroker - which probably makes a bit less torque than a typical 2110 - and a 3.88 (with stock .89 fourth).

70 mph comes in at about 3250 rpm, which is still pretty relaxed sounding.

BUT, I do appreciate having that little bit more torque for climbing. With a 3.44, I'd be downshifting for hills that I can now pull in top gear.

What you pick up on one end, you always lose somewhere else. You need to decide based on how much freeway cruising you do and how much time is spent on twisty, hilly two-lanes.

 

*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

The most common standard heavily used version of the freeway flyer with a 3.88. Same transmission in my Speedster - it works for our application. Even cruised to SLO for the west cost cruise and it was perfect

Sacto Mitch posted:

 

I have a mild 2026 cc stroker - which probably makes a bit less torque than a typical 2110 - and a 3.88 (with stock .89 fourth).

70 mph comes in at about 3250 rpm, which is still pretty relaxed sounding.

BUT, I do appreciate having that little bit more torque for climbing. With a 3.44, I'd be downshifting for hills that I can now pull in top gear.

What you pick up on one end, you always lose somewhere else. You need to decide based on how much freeway cruising you do and how much time is spent on twisty, hilly two-lanes.

 

Very good point there is a bit of a zone between 3rdand 4th with the 3:44 

*LongFella posted:
ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

The most common standard heavily used version of the freeway flyer with a 3.88. Same transmission in my Speedster - it works for our application. Even cruised to SLO for the west cost cruise and it was perfect

I really don't know what you're referring to when using that phrase, so- you're going to go with a 3.88 r&p, what 4th gear are you considering? And, the term "freeway flier" has no definitive meaning, so for the sake of clarity could we please stop using it so we all know exactly what we're talking about?

@IaM-Ray- If you stay with the stock 1st through 4th gear cluster there is no "zone" where engine speed in 3rd is too high yet too low in 4th; the spacing works with a stock engine and 3 different ring & pinions (4.375, 4.125 and 3.88). You may not feel comfortable pushing up a hill at 3500 in 3rd when the alternative is lugging it in 4th, but it's perfectly within the engine's capabilities to run like that for extended periods. Change the 4th from .89 to .82, though, now the spacing is even longer and you have to run the engine 200-300 rpm higher before shifting into 4th, and now it does become a problem!

  Each time VW lengthened the r&p ratio, a bigger engine with more power was supplied (went from 1200 to 1500 and finally to 1600 cc dual port) and the 3.44 will work as long as you pair it with an engine of 2 liters or more! It would probably be wise to consider a .93 in 4th as it will give the same highway speeds as 3.88/.82 (about 80-81 mph at 3500, give or take a mph or 2 depending on tire size); any faster isn't useful and is just a recipe for trouble with the law.  Al

ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

The most common standard heavily used version of the freeway flyer with a 3.88. Same transmission in my Speedster - it works for our application. Even cruised to SLO for the west cost cruise and it was perfect

I really don't know what you're referring to when using that phrase, so- you're going to go with a 3.88 r&p, what 4th gear are you considering? And, the term "freeway flier" has no definitive meaning, so for the sake of clarity could we please stop using it so we all know exactly what we're talking about?

@IaM-Ray- If you stay with the stock 1st through 4th gear cluster there is no "zone" where engine speed in 3rd is too high yet too low in 4th; the spacing works with a stock engine and 3 different ring & pinions (4.375, 4.125 and 3.88). You may not feel comfortable pushing up a hill at 3500 in 3rd when the alternative is lugging it in 4th, but it's perfectly within the engine's capabilities to run like that for extended periods. Change the 4th from .89 to .82, though, now the spacing is even longer and you have to run the engine 200-300 rpm higher before shifting into 4th, and now it does become a problem!

  Each time VW lengthened the r&p ratio, a bigger engine with more power was supplied (went from 1200 to 1500 and finally to 1600 cc dual port) and the 3.44 will work as long as you pair it with an engine of 2 liters or more! It would probably be wise to consider a .93 in 4th as it will give the same highway speeds as 3.88/.82 (about 80-81 mph at 3500, give or take a mph or 2 depending on tire size); any faster isn't useful and is just a recipe for trouble with the law.  Al

So you don't want me to say freeway flier anymore?

Freeway flier!

Ok, that's the last time

Ok, ok, I'm going to bring the bickering to an end. 

I propose highway-flyer, interstate-flyer, bonneville-salt-flat-flyer and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flyer.  These are, of course, all  used in the noun form.

If we are talking about it in verb form then it should be highway-flier, interstate-flier, bonneville-salt-flat-flier and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flier. 

Nuff said.

-=theron

Theron posted:

Ok, ok, I'm going to bring the bickering to an end. 

I propose highway-flyer, interstate-flyer, bonneville-salt-flat-flyer and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flyer.  These are, of course, all  used in the noun form.

If we are talking about it in verb form then it should be highway-flier, interstate-flier, bonneville-salt-flat-flier and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flier. 

Nuff said.

-=theron

Flyer, flier, pants on fire. Or is it fyer.

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