Skip to main content

Since I have been talking about it, might as well start "another" build thread

I thought the title was fitting, but I will defer to Theron if he wants me to change it or relocate this new build thread since I don't consider myself a NOOB anymore

As of now, I told Greg I'd like to bring the chassis home to start building by September 1st. In the meantime, I have been looking for some photos to see if anything stands out. Can my fellow SOC'rs help by posting some on this thread??

Current build thoughts:

  • Vintage Motorcars 1955 Pre A Coupe body (clean shaven: no bumpers, no side molding, no emblems... just the basic lights, license plate light shine down, beehive rear lights, horn grill, headlights... that's it)
  • VW shortened chassis (or tube frame if Greg can get it done in time)
  • Carrera White exterior (a must)
  • Red Leather interior (a must)
  • Grey German Square weave carpet (not sure?)
  • Black Vintage 190's all around (4.5 inch rim as a spare in the trunk - black) (a must)
  • 2110cc Vintage Motorcars engine (he did goo d on the last one, so I'll get another one), A1 exhaust (center exit - or custom route through bumper holes since I won't have bumpers)
  • 3.88 Freeway flyer trans (NO, I AM NOT DOING A 5 SPEED! LOL!)

 

This will be an OUTLAW. I did a classic build. Now, I want an outlaw coupe. Lowered (maybe on bags) and loud as hell!

I will be building this myself, as I did my Speedster, but will be sourcing must parts through Greg. Like I did before, I plan to get some stuff from all the Vendors - it's the nice thing to do

Let the Coupe build BEGIN! ! ! !

It's all part of the madness, right?

(PS - First set of photos are not a 1955, but highlight the the white paint with black rims I like - thank you @MusbJim. The second set of photos show a true 1955 Pre A - imagine the same interior, but in red and exterior without bumpers. The third set is the famous outlaw by Emory (spelling?) - I like the little touches he did.

Attachments

Images (27)
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_006
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_007
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_008
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_009
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_011
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_013
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_014
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_018
  • prsphoto_porsche_356_outlaw_timelessgarage_06052017_web_urban_020
  • IMG_9938
  • IMG_9939
  • IMG_9940
  • IMG_9942
  • IMG_9943
  • IMG_9944
  • IMG_9945
  • IMG_9946
  • IMG_9948
  • IMG_9949
  • IMG_9950
  • IMG_9951
  • Porsche 356 Emory Outlaw 1959 (1)
  • Porsche 356 Emory Outlaw 1959 (2)
  • Porsche 356 Emory Outlaw 1959 (3)
  • Porsche 356 Emory Outlaw 1959 (4)
  • Porsche 356 Emory Outlaw 1959 (5)
  • Porsche 356 Emory Outlaw 1959 (17)
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

*LongFella posted:

This is a 63', but that blue interior might be pretty cool even though I said the red was a must. "Different" should be a principle word in this build.

http://www.sportscarshop.com/1...rsche-356b-super-90/

Interiors colors are as personal as paint. 

I like red but not really burgundy. I like the blue on silver cars. I like tan leather on Navy cars and just generally. Not really big on black especially black on black, been there done that.

*LongFella posted:

Quick update...

Greg and I spoke yesterday and he plans to have the chassis ready by Wednesday of next week. I was hoping it would be ready tomorrow, but he is really busy and I don't want to be pushy... I did gave him a little crap just for fun

It will be nice to get another build started ! ! !

That 53 OUTLAW with the wipers anchored from the ROOF is amazing.....any chance that you can orchestrate that WIPER setup??

Banzai Pipeline posted:
*LongFella posted:

Quick update...

Greg and I spoke yesterday and he plans to have the chassis ready by Wednesday of next week. I was hoping it would be ready tomorrow, but he is really busy and I don't want to be pushy... I did gave him a little crap just for fun

It will be nice to get another build started ! ! !

That 53 OUTLAW with the wipers anchored from the ROOF is amazing.....any chance that you can orchestrate that WIPER setup??

I too think it's a cool look.

I know the shop he uses and they do/have quality stuff. I'll likely do the same as I did with my Speedster build and pick out custom interior colors.

I have been leaning towards a blue leather and tartan interior.

I have named the car "Whitewalker" after the GoT series on HBO... so the colors will be white/blue/black/grey...

I have several months before I even think about the body and interior since I am doin another pan up build like the Speedster.

Teby S posted:

Brian:

Seats for thought:   if you are doing an outlaw car I would suggest speedster seats instead of comfort.  That will give you more of the look that is outlaw. 

There are lots of unique things that make up an outlaw  so feel free to call with any questions.

Also square weave is the way to go.. I have it and it cleans up well and always looks great.

Tebs

 

I have square weave in my Speedster, so it will be a must in the Coupe. I'll have to get the the CEO (aka wifey) onboard with the speedster seats - her first thought was comfort seats in the coupe...

On this day, September 7th 2017, the start of an outlaw build - Whitewalker - begins its journey from nothingness to greatness! The madness continues!

A very BIG and HUGE thank you to Greg at Vintage Motorcars. He took the time tonight (keep in mind he has a family) to deliver the chassis to my house. I recently sold my truck and didn't have means to get the chassis home and he was willing to make the trip.

Greg also spent time listening to my vision of how Whitewalker will turn out. Some ideas will require some fabrication. I even proposed a new engine; I doubt anyone can guess. I've got a little more analysis to do, but I definitely got an eyebrow raise from Greg (MusbJim knows - so he doesn't count if he answers...)  

Time to get to work!!!

IMG_9344IMG_9345

Attachments

Images (2)
  • IMG_9344
  • IMG_9345
IaM-Ray posted:

I wonder if the dash can be changed to one that is from an A series with the key on the left ... personally that is my favourite.  I would make sure to have a lot of insulation in the coupe if you want to be in a comfortable car without too much noise.

I believe Greg's coupe does have the key on the left. Either way, I do plan to have a left side key on this build.

It will have a LOT of insulation - similar to how did my Speedster build...

IaM-Ray posted:

Brian... I like the pre 55 dash but I do prefer the 59A style ... so if Greg had a dash from a 59 era it would allow some flexibility for those who want the 59 era look.  Also the 55 dash is not so outlaw looking IMO. ... I love a coupe though so I will look forward to seeing it built.  

I see what you mean. They both look great. I kind of like the idea of not doing the same 3 gauge style since I have that on my Speedster... I could change my mind once I get to the body decisions.

I am firm on not having bumpers, trim, wind shield wipers (I'm going to try and pull of  the on wiper from the roof look), louvered rear deck lid, custom hinges (on top versus inside) of the rear deck lid and frunk (Greg and I briefly brainstormed the idea)...

No guesses on the engine?!? I do have experience working on it and heavily modifying it for a good amount of power...

Here's a few pics of my build/modifications on the engine I'm thinking of putting in Whitewalker.

This was one of my daily drivers several years ago.

Wait for it... wait for it...

It's an FA20 engine with a Jackson Racing Supercharger (Rotrex) kit. EcuTek tuned on 91 oct. CARB legal too. This little Scion (now Toyota 86) was a beast to drive! Toyota and Subaru got together and made this. It's basically a Subaru engine. Toyota only did minor stuff to it during the collaboration. It's smaller in size then the EJ20 (I believe). Stock puts out about 205hp. With the C38 kit, I was putting out about 285hp and 216tq on 91 CA oct (which is piss gas)..

I still need to figure some stuff out, specifically, engine management and if it can be stand alone... etc... The FA20 engines are SUPER easy to work on and pretty darn reliable IMO. Plus, I get Toyota parts at company cost so that helps...

Attachments

Images (18)
  • IMG_2535
  • IMG_2536
  • IMG_2537
  • IMG_2538
  • IMG_2539
  • IMG_2540
  • IMG_2541
  • IMG_2542
  • IMG_2543
  • IMG_2544
  • IMG_2545
  • IMG_2546
  • IMG_2547
  • IMG_2548
  • IMG_2552
  • IMG_2553
  • IMG_2554
  • IMG_2556

Here is more info on the supercharger kit. I know both Oscar and Oscar Jr. Really nice guys and they are a short drive away.

https://jacksonracing.com

Details about the Rotrex system they use:

https://jacksonracing.com/rotrex-technology/

I'll likely have to get the BRZ version of the FA20 as I believe the adapter plate will work (similar to the EJ20/EJ25 adapter folks use).

I still have a sh@# ton of research to do. It is just a vision at this point...

Gordon Nichols posted:

My second build zipped along a lot faster than the first, and didn't have the problems of the first, mostly because of this forum helping me along.

More Cost effective?   Naaaah.   Fewer mistakes, though, so maybe that helped to contain costs.  

He should be able to use all the same tools he bought during the first build, so I'd say t MIGHT be more cost effective. LOL 

Robert M posted:
Gordon Nichols posted:

My second build zipped along a lot faster than the first, and didn't have the problems of the first, mostly because of this forum helping me along.

More Cost effective?   Naaaah.   Fewer mistakes, though, so maybe that helped to contain costs.  

He should be able to use all the same tools he bought during the first build, so I'd say t MIGHT be more cost effective. LOL 

That will be the big savings spot - tools. I have all that I need now to do another build AND a few extra parts I can use on this build.

Don't kid yourself, Brian; you'll do more yourself and buy more tools. It never ends. I've been playing with VW stuff for over 40 years, have a full stand up tool box, recently put a smaller one on top and I'm starting to think a small metal lathe would be neat and and I could do so much with a milling table (do you know how easy it is to drill holes in round things with a rotary fixture? I have no idea what one costs, but it's really cool!). The question is where to put them; I could move the wife's car out of the garage, but I do like being married. What to do...

 Just make sure the tool box is big enough.

Last edited by ALB

If surface was prep'd/treated properly (degreased/metal prep) POR-15 would be more effective at stopping and preventing rust.  It's a rust encapsulator.  POR-15 takes an added top coat to protect it from UV rays.  Bedliner is effective at preventing nicks from stone damage and since it is thick - it cuts down on road noise but it is heavy.  

I used rubberized undercoating on a then new 1972 Porsche 914.  It ended up trapping water and probably causing more rust than it prevented (I lived in NJ and No. VA). The rubberized coating separated from the metal and caused air pockets.  In hind site, I did no prep other than ensure it was clean of mud/dirt.  Hopefully bedliner doesn't do the same - guess prep (de-greasing) is key.

Bedliner or rubberized under coating would be good in wheel wells where stones get thrown up as it would prevent spider cracks of fiberglass and also deaden sound (but I doubt the sound deadening would be noticeable).

The bed liner sure looks nice though!

Last edited by WOLFGANG
WOLFGANG posted:

If surface was prep'd/treated properly (degreased/metal prep) POR-15 would be more effective at stopping and preventing rust.  It's a rust encapsulator.  POR-15 takes an added top coat to protect it from UV rays.  Bedliner is effective at preventing nicks from stone damage and since it is thick - it cuts down on road noise but it is heavy.  

I used rubberized undercoating on a then new 1972 Porsche 914.  It ended up trapping water and probably causing more rust than it prevented (I lived in NJ and No. VA). The rubberized coating separated from the metal and caused air pockets.  In hind site, I did no prep other than ensure it was clean of mud/dirt.  Hopefully bedliner doesn't do the same - guess prep (de-greasing) is key.

Bedliner or rubberized under coating would be good in wheel wells where stones get thrown up as it would prevent spider cracks of fiberglass and also deaden sound (but I doubt the sound deadening would be noticeable).

The bed liner sure looks nice though!

It is all in the prep...

Prior to laying the bed liner down, the surface was completely sanded (using different grits). I removed everything (to almost bare metal in some spots). Next, I cleaned the service and degreased everything with a heavy cleaning solution. Lastly, I painted the service using a rest prevention paint. After the paint cured, I applied the bed liner material.

In essence, I created a rust proof and sound deadened chassis with added weight.

What made this time so much easier then last, I have a 30 gallon compressor and air tools. It made the process a BREEZE compared to hand sanding and painting...

There's a world of difference between ruberized undercoating and truck bed liner.

Properly applied, bed liner provides scratch protection no paint (no matter how good) can ever hope to match. It's thickness and ruggedness encapsulates better than paint as well. The only reason to paint under it is to cover any spots that might be missed in the application of the liner. 

Sand, clean, paint with rust reforming primer, and coat with bed liner, and it'll last way longer than any of us will.

Last edited by Stan Galat

I will be following your build LONGFELLA. The outlaw theme can come across in various ways, and that personalization is what makes it yours.

I am going outlaw coupe also (having it built), and my Idea is race car for outlaw. Not full slammed, but low-ish. I hope to gas it through bumps. My CEO is also on board as she rarely will get on my motorcycle, so I have to have certain creature comforts. Four of which come to mind right off the top of my head... Heat & a/c (attainable with Subie power). Quiet exhaust - noise is fatigue (at least for the wife). Quiet and fast. And seats with head rests, for that inevitable snooze/nod on the way home after a long day. There are a couple of seats with the outlaw-ish look with headrests. Keep the seats low. Other than that, no frills.

Interesting motor choice you have in mind. Different is good. Excess headaches to achieve are not. Enjoy the build!

If you’re building a coupe, you may also want to consider (1.) a really quiet exhaust system (I mean, really quiet) and (2.) an air intake plenum for the carbs or throttle body to reduce the pulsed intake noise (which sounds a lot like exhaust noise) which is just behind the rear seats.  The inside of a coupe body is like sitting in a phone booth and the noise level in there can get pretty loud.  

Jim Kelly posted:

As a coupe owner, I can attest that it's not hard at all to make the interior quiet, even with Tiger's exhaust and a mid-engine Subi turbo.  Just use a quality sound deadener and follow instructions.  After all, if Specialty Auto Sports can make a quiet coupe, how hard can it be?

Yes follow our directions, and it will all go right   

 

I have a mild 2026 cc stroker - which probably makes a bit less torque than a typical 2110 - and a 3.88 (with stock .89 fourth).

70 mph comes in at about 3250 rpm, which is still pretty relaxed sounding.

BUT, I do appreciate having that little bit more torque for climbing. With a 3.44, I'd be downshifting for hills that I can now pull in top gear.

What you pick up on one end, you always lose somewhere else. You need to decide based on how much freeway cruising you do and how much time is spent on twisty, hilly two-lanes.

 

*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

The most common standard heavily used version of the freeway flyer with a 3.88. Same transmission in my Speedster - it works for our application. Even cruised to SLO for the west cost cruise and it was perfect

Sacto Mitch posted:

 

I have a mild 2026 cc stroker - which probably makes a bit less torque than a typical 2110 - and a 3.88 (with stock .89 fourth).

70 mph comes in at about 3250 rpm, which is still pretty relaxed sounding.

BUT, I do appreciate having that little bit more torque for climbing. With a 3.44, I'd be downshifting for hills that I can now pull in top gear.

What you pick up on one end, you always lose somewhere else. You need to decide based on how much freeway cruising you do and how much time is spent on twisty, hilly two-lanes.

 

Very good point there is a bit of a zone between 3rdand 4th with the 3:44 

*LongFella posted:
ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

The most common standard heavily used version of the freeway flyer with a 3.88. Same transmission in my Speedster - it works for our application. Even cruised to SLO for the west cost cruise and it was perfect

I really don't know what you're referring to when using that phrase, so- you're going to go with a 3.88 r&p, what 4th gear are you considering? And, the term "freeway flier" has no definitive meaning, so for the sake of clarity could we please stop using it so we all know exactly what we're talking about?

@IaM-Ray- If you stay with the stock 1st through 4th gear cluster there is no "zone" where engine speed in 3rd is too high yet too low in 4th; the spacing works with a stock engine and 3 different ring & pinions (4.375, 4.125 and 3.88). You may not feel comfortable pushing up a hill at 3500 in 3rd when the alternative is lugging it in 4th, but it's perfectly within the engine's capabilities to run like that for extended periods. Change the 4th from .89 to .82, though, now the spacing is even longer and you have to run the engine 200-300 rpm higher before shifting into 4th, and now it does become a problem!

  Each time VW lengthened the r&p ratio, a bigger engine with more power was supplied (went from 1200 to 1500 and finally to 1600 cc dual port) and the 3.44 will work as long as you pair it with an engine of 2 liters or more! It would probably be wise to consider a .93 in 4th as it will give the same highway speeds as 3.88/.82 (about 80-81 mph at 3500, give or take a mph or 2 depending on tire size); any faster isn't useful and is just a recipe for trouble with the law.  Al

ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
ALB posted:
*LongFella posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

I have read it ..yes... hope I did not miss something.  I though you mentioned 3:88 in this build I was suggesting a 3:44... that is all. 

I will be sticking to the basic Freeway Flyer trans (let the bashing begin!)

The term "freeway flyer" was made up by a now defunct company in the 1980's and means different things to different people- what r&p/4th gear combo are you considering for the car?

The most common standard heavily used version of the freeway flyer with a 3.88. Same transmission in my Speedster - it works for our application. Even cruised to SLO for the west cost cruise and it was perfect

I really don't know what you're referring to when using that phrase, so- you're going to go with a 3.88 r&p, what 4th gear are you considering? And, the term "freeway flier" has no definitive meaning, so for the sake of clarity could we please stop using it so we all know exactly what we're talking about?

@IaM-Ray- If you stay with the stock 1st through 4th gear cluster there is no "zone" where engine speed in 3rd is too high yet too low in 4th; the spacing works with a stock engine and 3 different ring & pinions (4.375, 4.125 and 3.88). You may not feel comfortable pushing up a hill at 3500 in 3rd when the alternative is lugging it in 4th, but it's perfectly within the engine's capabilities to run like that for extended periods. Change the 4th from .89 to .82, though, now the spacing is even longer and you have to run the engine 200-300 rpm higher before shifting into 4th, and now it does become a problem!

  Each time VW lengthened the r&p ratio, a bigger engine with more power was supplied (went from 1200 to 1500 and finally to 1600 cc dual port) and the 3.44 will work as long as you pair it with an engine of 2 liters or more! It would probably be wise to consider a .93 in 4th as it will give the same highway speeds as 3.88/.82 (about 80-81 mph at 3500, give or take a mph or 2 depending on tire size); any faster isn't useful and is just a recipe for trouble with the law.  Al

So you don't want me to say freeway flier anymore?

Freeway flier!

Ok, that's the last time

Ok, ok, I'm going to bring the bickering to an end. 

I propose highway-flyer, interstate-flyer, bonneville-salt-flat-flyer and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flyer.  These are, of course, all  used in the noun form.

If we are talking about it in verb form then it should be highway-flier, interstate-flier, bonneville-salt-flat-flier and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flier. 

Nuff said.

-=theron

Theron posted:

Ok, ok, I'm going to bring the bickering to an end. 

I propose highway-flyer, interstate-flyer, bonneville-salt-flat-flyer and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flyer.  These are, of course, all  used in the noun form.

If we are talking about it in verb form then it should be highway-flier, interstate-flier, bonneville-salt-flat-flier and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flier. 

Nuff said.

-=theron

Flyer, flier, pants on fire. Or is it fyer.

ALB posted:

You can say it all you want, but since we don't know exactly what you're talking about, when you're asking for advice it's a little hard to know what to tell you. Just sayin'...

So, you still haven't answered my question- what 4th gear are you running?

Standard VW 1-4 gearing with a 3.88 RP. I’m not at home at the moment so I don’t have the actual 1-4 gear numbers. Trans in the Speedster was from Kirk at VS - so I could reach out to him and his vendor to get the actual numbers, but that take too long  

Theron posted:

Ok, ok, I'm going to bring the bickering to an end. 

I propose highway-flyer, interstate-flyer, bonneville-salt-flat-flyer and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flyer.  These are, of course, all  used in the noun form.

If we are talking about it in verb form then it should be highway-flier, interstate-flier, bonneville-salt-flat-flier and really-long-straight-downhill-country-road-flier. 

Nuff said.

-=theron

I like your thinking Theron

The 3.44 with a .93 is pretty much the perfect highway final drive for a 2L+ mill. It's the same as a .82 with a 3.88, but using the .82/3.88 with a stock 3rd makes the reach from 3rd to 4th pretty much unusable.

I've got a 3.10/2.06/1.31/.93 with a 3.44. The mainshaft is custom, as is 3rd. The .93 was OG on '73 onward Beetles. "Standard" Rancho (and others) ratios are 3.78/2.06/1.26/.89, generally with a 4.12.

"Freeway Fliers" can mean stock gearing with a 3.88 R/P, or stock gearing with a .82 4th and a 4.12. The 3.88 version is far, far better.

 

Last edited by Stan Galat

My Spyder came with a 3.88 r&p and a .82 4th which would have created that big gap between 3rd and 4th, which is why I changed the gears to a 3.44 and a .93.

That's what I run in the TD as well and it works a treat: 1st is plenty low for starting off on hills and she gets up and goes just fine. Probably hits 60 in about 6 seconds flat at the top of second gear. I'm sure the 3.88 would be quicker off the line but I didn't build her to drag race.

The 2.2 Subaru, with 140 ft-lbs and 135 hp, loves this trans in Bridget, which weighs about 1800 pounds. 6000 rpm in 3rd is 100 mph (theoretically, of course); 3000 rpm in 4th is about 70 mph and that's the sweet spot for keeping up with highway traffic, even if I'd rather be doing 50 mph on a shaded two-lane.

I'm thinking the same gears should work just about as well in a 1400 (or so)-pound Spyder pushed by a 120 hp 1915. Same red line as the Suby (they both peak about 5500 and pull through 6000). The Spyder's power-to-weight will be a little better, with each horse moving a little under 12 pounds, as opposed to a little more than 13 pounds in Bridget. 

Picking the Spyder's transaxle up next Saturday, and progress continues.

Folks:

So I go away for a bit and you knuckle heads start up again about transmissions..

Have you not read Terry Nuckles 10 million best selling book, "Trans-Mission, aint like fish'n", captivating guide book on how to set up a proper transmission for your driving needs.

Let me throw in my $100,000 opinion.. (that would be $3 million in Canadian)

all of these parts work in concert:

Rims and Tire size (which nobody mentioned), engine, transmission.

Once you know the exact engine size and specs and the exact size rims and tire size your going to use and never deviate, THEN decide on the gearing and what you want form the transmission,  and your driving preferences..

You can go to the weddle gear site and play with the gear ratio calculator

https://weddleindustries.com/gear-calculator

I know you don't want a 5 speed.  This will be a big help not only to understand the gear selection and RP but to fine tune your gears to fit your driving needs and get the best from a 4 speed..  It will show you the RPM's for each gear and the gaps....  Its a great tool and was a huge help when I had Scott Sebastian Build my transmission.. Which works well with my tire size, engine and my personal driving needs.  

Sorry I went a little Stan G here

Tebs

damn!! my finger hurts from all this typing

 

I've got the same trans as Stan, except I DON'T have a custom gear set.

That custom mainshaft for 1-2 is pricey!

His 3.10 1st is custom, as is his 3rd and 4th.

Stock 1-4 is 3.80, 2.06, 1.26, and 0.89. Which works well in a 1500 pound Spyder with 170 hp on a 3.44 final. I submit it would be REALLY nice to split 3rd, a little shorter and a little longer, and use the stock 4th as 5th. But that's not financially feasible in MY car. Unless it was built that way from the start.

Ed, that's a good choice with less power on tap. For those with heavier Speedsters, unless you have torque monsters, I wouldn't recommend anything taller than the 3.88 final.

Quick update on the build...

Picked up the front beam, disc brakes, hard lines (decided to not make my own on this build), master cylinder, pedals, caster shims, all hardware, etc.

Should have it all in within an hour or two this weekend to complete the front end. Pics will follow  I decided on a single adjustable (versus both tubes) set in the neutral position (for now) and 2" drop spindles. I can use the single adjustment to get the perfect stance. Whitewalker is going to have a very aggressive stance.

@550 Phil - I was drueling over your Spyder at Greg's shop when I was there. Didn't have time to take photos, but that engine... damn she looks good!!!

My goal: Have both the coupe and speedster cruising through wine country for the next West Coast Cruise

Bill Prout posted:

I'm curious as to why the textured finish vs smooth since you planned on using the Dynamat? I'd be concerned with air pockets and moisture between the two.

Top notch job either way!

When applying, I use a heat gun to soften and make the bottom more tacky. IMO this helps stick the product on better and work in all the little pits/pockets/curves.

I also used truck bed liner to add weight to the chassis and water proof it all. Even if water did get under the dynomat it won’t penetrate the truck bed liner. Some weight idea/thinking applies to the dynomat. Helps with sound proofing, sealing, and adds weight...

But I’m no expert in all this. It’s only my second build!

Quick little update...

Got to see Greg the past couple of days this week and pick up some more parts for the Coupe. Trans has been ordered and should be in next week. Only need the custom rims and tires and I'll have the rolling chassis complete.

I also talked about the body and the look I am going for so Greg knows what to do for the body. We agreed on price for the body, paint, glass, trim and rubber. I am planning to make the deposit at the end of this week or next week to get things moving.

On a side note... his shop is PACKED full of awesomeness. He certainly looked a little stressed with how busy things are. I told him to crawl to the desert and take a weekend off

Those things dont fit my transmission (or any trans with heavy duty side plates.)

I thought maybe if i could get someone to widen that center plate so the fingers would fit then maybe. The only issue I can see there is that maybe the widened version would then hit the frame horns.

It's pretty tight under there. I actually had to shave the frame horns so the side plate bolts wouldn't rub.

Last edited by TRP