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It's funny you say that Danny.  While this is the factory PTS formula for Oslo Blue, so many of the old Porsche colors have a direct cross reference to European Standard colors and fleet colors.  Dutch Racing Orange is a common traffic orange,  and a couple of the Porsche reds and yellows are as well.  But Dutch Racing Orange sounds so much cooler than traffic cone orange doesn't it?

The American colors have this often as well.  Ron's Spyder is the best example, as the Blue Angels blue and yellow is such an iconic combination, just doesn't sound as cool when you realize its the standard USPS drop box blue and OSHA safety yellow...

Hey Lane,

Are you going bare bones? Any plans for Bluetooth sound or air conditioning? Also, Carey was talking about possible modifications for the engine compartment cover. Anything on that front? My comment to him months ago was that checking the engine oil had to be as convenient as possible, especially with these Subys. Some are known to eat oil. 

Last edited by Ron Mullis

"It looks like "utility cabinet blue" paint. Nice."

I hadn't noticed that, but it really does match the top cabinet, doesn't it?

I wouldn't call it bare bones.  It will have A/C and power windows after all.  Carey hasn't shared any changes in the engine cover design with me yet.  I'm sure it'll work.

Marty: The plan was for an oxblood leather for seats, dash, doors, etc., with oatmeal carpets.  I've seen some gorgeous gray interiors, but I've burned out a bit on gray and would like some richer color.  I could possibly be persuaded if folks want to post picture suggestions.

Last edited by Lane Anderson

Apparently it’s hit or miss with these SUBY crate short blocks. Joe Fortino’s and mine came together and were assembled at the same time. His ran dry and blew up. I caught mine when it was down 2 quarts after 1500 miles. To this day my engine will eat a quart every 1000-1200 miles, depending on how I drive it. Joe’s new engine does not eat oil. 

There is a long and well documented history of these engines running dry within a normal 3000 mile service period. It’s absolutely essential to check the oil religiously. Carey thought it might be helpful to have a small access panel to the dipstick so the entire engine cover could remain in place when checking oil. I thought that was a great idea  

Funny thing, these things don’t smoke. You would think they would. 

I think they do when you romp on them. That’s when they really eat oil. I never saw Joe’s smoking and have asked numerous people if mine does under normal or light load. My guess is the rings bypass at all rpms, directly correlated to rpm. 

A guy I know replaced the rings with new factory rings. His oil usage actually increased slightly. Go figure. 

My wife has a 2.5 liter, 4-cyl Subaru, and a friend of hers has the big Suby 6-cylinder, both bought within 6 months of each other.

The 4-cylinder eats a quart every 2000 - 2500 miles.  Been that way since new and now has 100K on the clock but it is never driven hard at all.

The 6-cylinder eats a quart every 500 - 800 miles and it, too, has been this way since new.   She has  learned to add oil every other gas fill-up.  She also has a lead foot (her husband is even worse).  

 BTW:  Some Subarus have the optional Electric Oil Level Sensor.  You could add it and have a dash Gauge.

https://www.subaruparts.com/oe...el-sensor-11136aa111

Last edited by Gordon Nichols

 

Ron Mullis posted:

Apparently it’s hit or miss with these SUBY crate short blocks. Joe Fortino’s and mine came together and were assembled at the same time. His ran dry and blew up. I caught mine when it was down 2 quarts after 1500 miles. To this day my engine will eat a quart every 1000-1200 miles, depending on how I drive it. Joe’s new engine does not eat oil. 

There is a long and well documented history of these engines running dry within a normal 3000 mile service period. It’s absolutely essential to check the oil religiously. Carey thought it might be helpful to have a small access panel to the dipstick so the entire engine cover could remain in place when checking oil. I thought that was a great idea  

Funny thing, these things don’t smoke. You would think they would. 

Some do not take any oil some do and some have head gasket issues. 

The reality is that if you have to add a quart every 1000 miles it does seem a bit much even if that is subaru's info printed. 

My car as well can take up to 2 quarts per 3000miles it depends on my driving. 

I discovered my car was using oil on my maiden voyage I just had a thought to check the oil on my first gaz stop then I noticed a bit of use then the next stop I added 1/2 a quart and that is how I discovered the issue and continue to monitor it. 

My car as well can take up to 2 quarts per 3000miles it depends on my driving. 

In cool weather, cruising, I’m down a full quart every 1500 miles. Hot and on it, more like every 1200 miles. I wasn’t exactly tracking it the first 1500 miles on the car, but I know it was more like a quart every 600-700 miles. So it has improved somewhat but is holding pretty steady since. I have thought about a new short block, but really it’s quite possible that I get one that does the same thing. The car runs fine otherwise, so I’ve decided to live with it. 

Michelle's 2006 2.5 SOHC Impreza leaks it out(cam/crank seals that I don't feel like changing), no burning/using after 200k. But we park it in the gravel and add a little every other fillup.

My daughter's identical car doesn't use any. Same mileage, maybe 190K.

My son has a 2002 Legacy, 2.5 SOHC, 250k on it. Doesn't use much at all, maybe a half quart every 3000.

Lane, monitor it until you know usage if any.

Not sure I'm adding anything here, but I talked with John at OutFront Motorsports. He's building my 2.5 Subaru motor. He is very particular about the break in procedure: what oil (Motul 10/40 break-in oil or equivalent), what engine speeds (particularly in the first 1500 miles), oil changes at 100, 500, 1000, and the every 1000 miles up to 3000 total, then switch to whatever oil you want). He says it's critical to the sealing of the rings, etc.

Even at that a quart per 1200miles is within Subaru spec. but following the procedure should keep that much lower, unless you are running high performance pistons with greater clearances that stock.

JMM (Michael) posted:

Not sure I'm adding anything here, but I talked with John at OutFront Motorsports. He's building my 2.5 Subaru motor. He is very particular about the break in procedure: what oil (Motul 10/40 break-in oil or equivalent), what engine speeds (particularly in the first 1500 miles), oil changes at 100, 500, 1000, and the every 1000 miles up to 3000 total, then switch to whatever oil you want). He says it's critical to the sealing of the rings, etc.

Even at that a quart per 1200miles is within Subaru spec. but following the procedure should keep that much lower, unless you are running high performance pistons with greater clearances that stock.

Those oil change numbers are excessive as far as I'm concerned. The most important thing to me is get the original oil out early and do the proper break in procedure. Varying rpm and an occasional burst of acceleration to expand the rings. 

edsnova posted:

My 2.2 never used a drop of oil but I've now done the head gaskets three times so...

I think you need to find a new mechanic LOL!

I did head gaskets on Michelle's 2.5 SOHC two years ago. Cleaned the head and block with Nylon bristle wheels on a drill. Bought a Fel-Pro gasket, and sprayed both sides with Copper-Coat. Followed the factory torque procedure, which has 3 stages and two different patterns, and done. Checked for flat heads with a machinist straightedge and feeler gauges. It was flat, no machining needed. No problems since then, except the leaky cam seals that I was too lazy to swap out.

The Subaru gaskets are junk, and are the problem. You could see where the leakage was occurring and see the failure. Why people use them I'll never understand. Why would you put the same failed part back in, albeit a new one? Isn't it obvious that it will fail again?

Stan Galat posted:
IaM-Ray posted:

Oil usage is pretty rare I think in most VW or Hondas at least in all the ones I have.  

Oil use is unheard of in any Detroit vehicle. There would be a recall of massive proportions, class-action lawsuits as far as the eye could see, and a 20% drop in share prices if GM, Ford, or Dodge burned oil at a rate of 1 qt/1200 mi.

My Subie tech guys suggest I use a 5w40 which they run in their race cars and they say it cures the oil usage for those motors that seem to use some. 

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