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Hi All. I am a new owner of a 1956 Porsche 356 widebody made by Innovative street machines, AKA Street Beasts. My project is not the typical VW pan construction, but a custom frame that the company had offered back in the 2000's. It looks to be well built, and I am very excited to start this project. I am hoping to connect with some other people that have this type of replica, and most importantly this type of frame! I am from Fresno, California, and hope to meet people in my area that have the same love of these cars as I do. 

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Things that need to be done:  SB has the kick panels inboard of the 2 x 4 steel box frame , they need to be moved using sheet metal to the outer -wheel well side on the steel frame to allow for a wider foot well and so that your left foot can operate the clutch safety. The donor rear torsion assembly is secured with two 2" clamps, best to have the torsion welded to the SB "frame".

Last edited by Alan Merklin

On earlier pan CMCs, the kick panels are on the other side (outside) of the steel frame.  My size 12 would not fit well there.

At lease SB fixed the often too close to the driver's rear wheel well opening by requiring the torsion assembly to be mounted with bolts.  It can now be aligned to allow both sides to be equal.

@Stunned Mullet I live in Fresno as does @Teby S and @arajani and @Miguel & Jessica and we go on a lot of drives together. @Troy Sloan refreshes a lot of these cars and he lives here too. He's not so much a builder as he is a refresher. However, he has a lot of knowledge and could probably offer some assistance as could the rest of us. especially if you need to see a completed car in person.

You mentioned Ovidios. Are you close to there? I'm near Herndon and Marks area.

CMC morphed into Street Beasts; those wide flared CMCs which were displayed at certain airports back in the late '70's and early '80's (which I believe are not the extra wide flared models later done by Vintage Speedsters) were the start of my infatuation with Speedsters. It would take over 20 years for me to make my dream come true and finally get one and we're still here 16 years later still enjoying that same car.

@Impala posted:

CMC morphed into Street Beasts; those wide flared CMCs which were displayed at certain airports back in the late '70's and early '80's (which I believe are not the extra wide flared models later done by Vintage Speedsters) were the start of my infatuation with Speedsters. It would take over 20 years for me to make my dream come true and finally get one and we're still here 16 years later still enjoying that same car.

You are correct, they are not the "extra wide models later done by Vintage Speedsters", but they are also not the same as the more mild flared Speedsters built by Vintage Speedsters.

It's a suttle difference and you have to look closely to see it, but the flared Speedsters built by Street Beast, CMC and FiberFab are not the same as either of the two flared versions built by Vintage Speedsters.

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