OK, so my MIG welds are as good as Ed’s, for sure.

And that’s coming from someone with no faith in my MIG welding abilities.

Do we now compare our welders and see which one is better?  (I don’t think so!)

Or do we just keep on welding and not caring about what others think?

HEY!   If the weld holds, it’s a great weld!

The burning of the flux creates a gas shield that protects the weld pool from oxygen intrusion.  So does the Argon/CO2 mix.  So you have two belt and suspender options:  

1.  Use both if either the flux or gas cloud is inadequate.  This could be because it is a small job and you can’t justify getting another tank of the proper gas mix for your application.  That’s OK, we understand.  It might not be cheap for the hobbyist. 

2.  Get the right gas mix for the metals/wire/rod you are using so you don’t need the flux.  Using flux is usually only necessary when you don’t have a proper inert gas (Argon mix) shield for the weld pool.

As a hobby welder, this stuff is often a trade-off and I still have a reel or two of fluxed wire-feed or torch rod, but I use it less and less.  I always used a fluxed rod for stick welds (we had a Forney 250 amp stick welder) because it was old school and was open weld only.

I no longer do enough welding to be on a first name basis with my local welding resource supplier, so I don’t get deep discounts and let me tell yah, this stuff ain’t cheap, so I have my 80/20 Argon/CO2 bottle and that has to do for anything I MIG weld.  Whether it works or not determines what I use for a wire or rod.  I have a Clarke 130 MIG gas/no gas welder with a 50% duty cycle so it’s up to any challenge I throw at it, whether I am up to the challenge or not.  Mostly, because it CAN run gas, I run no-flux wire and just use the gas, but I can’t tailor the gas mix to the metals being welded and used as wire filler so I just live with what I’ve got.

I make structurally strong MIG welds, not necessarily pretty MIG welds.  You want pretty?  Then I reach for the torch or TIG, especially for sheet metal welds.  Or my angle grinder, after the fact.

edsnova posted:

Meanwhile, fluxcore boy over here just...trying stuff.IMG_3741

Spyder's tail pipe gets two little ears. Above is the first one. And done:

IMG_3745

It's only "ugly" if you really look at it....

I don't know Ed. I think that would be ugly even if the lights were turned off. 

Not saying I could do any better, it's been 37 years since I had a welding class.  However, retirement is coming and I'm thinking some night classes in welding are in my future.

Danny..."something cathartic about pulsed tig"...Sounds like you've done enough to recognize that.  To me...I think I feel it or hear it but when I'm on target, you just know. An old welder that taught me a few things said it "sings" to him.

I sold my Miller Tag.  I just didn't use it enough to justify keeping it. The Mig ? I use it all the time.

When Mig welding aluminum (spool gun attachment) I use 100% argon, 5356 aluminum wire (.030).  You can use the more popular 4043 wire if you want but the 5356 is stiffer and seems to go thru better. If using the 4043, use a copper .035 gun tip with it.  Also don't be afraid to set up the feed speed to maximum then back off if needed. This is where a lot of people get in trouble. Insufficient supply of filler rod is hard to figure out that this is what is needed..........Bruce

wrx speedster posted:

I bought my coupe from Tim also,he had two left when I bought mine. plus the one he was building. I am finally  ready to get started but having a hard time finding a manual steering rack. Can you see any  numbers and/or  name on yours?

I will try and remember to look when I get home from work tomorrow.  I will PM you my number if you wanna text to remind me.  I forget a lot of stuff by the time I get home.

Gordon Nichols posted:

The burning of the flux creates a gas shield that protects the weld pool from oxygen intrusion.  So does the Argon/CO2 mix.  So you have two belt and suspender options:  

1.  Use both if either the flux or gas cloud is inadequate.  This could be because it is a small job and you can’t justify getting another tank of the proper gas mix for your application.  That’s OK, we understand.  It might not be cheap for the hobbyist. 

2.  Get the right gas mix for the metals/wire/rod you are using so you don’t need the flux.  Using flux is usually only necessary when you don’t have a proper inert gas (Argon mix) shield for the weld pool.

As a hobby welder, this stuff is often a trade-off and I still have a reel or two of fluxed wire-feed or torch rod, but I use it less and less.  I always used a fluxed rod for stick welds (we had a Forney 250 amp stick welder) because it was old school and was open weld only.

I no longer do enough welding to be on a first name basis with my local welding resource supplier, so I don’t get deep discounts and let me tell yah, this stuff ain’t cheap, so I have my 80/20 Argon/CO2 bottle and that has to do for anything I MIG weld.  Whether it works or not determines what I use for a wire or rod.  I have a Clarke 130 MIG gas/no gas welder with a 50% duty cycle so it’s up to any challenge I throw at it, whether I am up to the challenge or not.  Mostly, because it CAN run gas, I run no-flux wire and just use the gas, but I can’t tailor the gas mix to the metals being welded and used as wire filler so I just live with what I’ve got.

I make structurally strong MIG welds, not necessarily pretty MIG welds.  You want pretty?  Then I reach for the torch or TIG, especially for sheet metal welds.  Or my angle grinder, after the fact.

That is a whole new lingo, so most of it is over my head, but I did get the analogy.  I am going with suspenders, if only to be different.

wrx speedster posted:

I like 75% argon 25% co2 mix on stainless, 100% argon seems to make a ropy weld for me, Has anyone tried tri- mix on stainless? I don"t believe there is such a thing as flux-core stainless wire. Bigger is better but one can put on a 3/16 bead with a 110ac mig welder.

Blue Demon 308LFC-0 Stainless Flex Core Wire - The only reason I knew about this is because If I was going to use my friend's mig welder, I was gonna have to buy this wire.  As far as I have found, it is the only stainless flux core.

Need some advice from you welders:  The first thing that I will have to weld is round tube cut at an angle welded to flat plate, like the photo.  What I noticed about welding a round tube cut at an angle to the flat plate is that just as I am getting my groove on, I have to stop, and readjust to get the angle on my nozzle to the joint back to a good position.  And when I stop, my weld is not as good as when keep I going at a consistent speed.  The stop and start points look like poop.

practice-weld

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Todd:  That weld actually looks pretty good!  When I have to work around an item, I try to mount it or even spot tag a weld to something I can turn with one hand.  Even getting on the floor with a 4 wheel dolly and a plate on top of that would work.  I know exactly what you are going through!  The learning curve moves quickly with practice.... Good luck on your project! 

Safety Jim Buffalo NY. posted:

Todd:  That weld actually looks pretty good!  When I have to work around an item, I try to mount it or even spot tag a weld to something I can turn with one hand.  Even getting on the floor with a 4 wheel dolly and a plate on top of that would work.  I know exactly what you are going through!  The learning curve moves quickly with practice.... Good luck on your project! 

Perfect!  And if I put a welding helmut on my wife, she can turn the dolly whilst I weld!

Todd M posted:

Need some advice from you welders:  The first thing that I will have to weld is round tube cut at an angle welded to flat plate, like the photo.  What I noticed about welding a round tube cut at an angle to the flat plate is that just as I am getting my groove on, I have to stop, and readjust to get the angle on my nozzle to the joint back to a good position.  And when I stop, my weld is not as good as when keep I going at a consistent speed.  The stop and start points look like poop.

practice-weld

What your really supposed to do is get a lazy Susan and have her spin it around.

Get rid of the flux core and buy a real Mig with gas.  You will not have nearly as much splatter, the welds will be stronger with less inclusions.

 

If you are going to stick with flux core, when you stop to reposition, wire brush the weld clean before starting again.  When using flux flux core, pull the weld, instead of pushing like mig.

IaM-Ray posted:
Todd M posted:

Need some advice from you welders:  The first thing that I will have to weld is round tube cut at an angle welded to flat plate, like the photo.  What I noticed about welding a round tube cut at an angle to the flat plate is that just as I am getting my groove on, I have to stop, and readjust to get the angle on my nozzle to the joint back to a good position.  And when I stop, my weld is not as good as when keep I going at a consistent speed.  The stop and start points look like poop.

What your really supposed to do is get a lazy Susan and have her spin it around.

That is actually a great idea!

LI-Rick posted:

Get rid of the flux core and buy a real Mig with gas.  You will not have nearly as much splatter, the welds will be stronger with less inclusions.

 

If you are going to stick with flux core, when you stop to reposition, wire brush the weld clean before starting again.  When using flux flux core, pull the weld, instead of pushing like mig.

You are right.  I had reconsidered buying one until I need to do the stainless, but now I remember that done correctly, a tig welder will produce less splatter and the brownish residue from the flux.

First test weld with the new tig welder.  Started on the right and couldn't seem to get a pool going, so I started turning up the amps little by little.  The left side was done using about 110 amps.  Does that sound ok?  It sounds high to me, but the me in that statement is comprised of very little knowledge and a whole lotta guessing.  Do you just adjust to what works?  The metal in the photo is mild steel.

First-TIG-weld

TIG welding with Argon is much cleaner, and consistent than flux core MIG welding.

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DannyP posted:

Any weld is cleaner with gas, even when you dare to use both for better penetration on too-thick materials for your 110 volt machine.

The voltage is 240.  Even getting the right outlet and amperage to the garage was a journey.  Nothing is ever simple.

I was turning up the amperage until I hit about 110, and that is where it seemed to make a nice puddle.  It appears to me a real trick to get the amperage correct and move the torch at the right speed and feed the wire at the right speed.  And if I change the thickness of the material, everything changes again.  It ain't simple.  Tomorrow I am going to start practicing on stainless, since my frame is stainless, and the first weld I need to make on the car itself will be stainless.  Wish me luck.

Todd, that was directed at a certain naysayer. Not you. Good luck tomorrow.

Fyi, this is mild steel with a 110 volt Mig. Start-puddle-stop,tiny pause, start again. I didn't clean in between. Pulled, not pushed. The key is to start again before it cools completely. It's a crankcase breather so not structural.I think it looks almost like Tig20190913_143900

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@LI-Rick - I had been cleaning my tungstens with lacquer thinner because as a woodworker, lacquer thinner is my go to cleaner.  I don't have any acetone, so I ran up to the depot and got some.  I clean my parts and my tungstens with acetone, and go to it.  My tungsten tip burned off to a square nub, so I change it, and the same thing happens to my other nice sharp tungstens.  I curse LI-Rick and his dumb acetone, resharpen my tungstens, and clean with lacquer thinner.  The same thing happens.  So, I start from zero and finally that I had turned of my gas before I went to the depot, but neglected to turn it back on.  I guess it will be awhile before I make that mistake again.

BTW, still getting some voids, and am now practicing with stainless.

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