Novice asking for any advice

Just ordered my first 1957 356 speedster replica and will be finished and delivered in November 2018. Builder: Vintage Motorcars (Speedsters) of Scottsdale Az. Have owned  1964 bug and 1966 bus 25 years ago.  I would be more than appreciative if anyone has any words of wisdom and advice moving forward to make this new venture/transition smooth such as: first things first when the car arrives,  Or, how about any advice for car  insurance, or maintenance schedules, etc. Any advice would help to avoid any novice mistakes. thank you.

Danny  the newbie

Original Post

Welcome to the Madness, Danny!

There is a new vehicle delivery checklist that should be helpful, found under the Resource tab up above and here:

https://www.speedsterowners.co...acceptance-checklist

For maintenance and such, just get a good VW service manual like a Bentley or Chiltons or Heywood and do what that tells you.  They’re not complicated cars, but you’ll be getting a brand new one so there is some break-in things to consider, which we can help walk you through.

For insurance, I use Hagerty, but there are other options so shop around and get the best deal you can.

Good luck with your new toy!

I would go out and visit the builder before it is completed and when it is done.  Drive it around Phoenix for a week or 2 making a list of any issues found that need to be fixed before paying in full and taking delivery.  Not prudent to sit back and just wait for it to be delivered to their doorstep.  Make sure you get a detailed engine/trans build sheet - to include parts used (like Engle 110 cam, heads, size of valves, etc).  Is this a VW pan or custom chassis build? How will it be registered in your home - California. Assume it is an air cooled engine?  Ensure a competent engine builder builds the engine.

None of this is aimed at Vintage Motor cars - it would apply to custom car builder.

There is a short VS owners manual posted here.  Far from comprehensive.  Spring for a Bently manual and How to Keep Your VW alive.

Newbie Danny Bader of Nipomo posted:

Thx Robert 

Make sure you read this article so you know the difference between Agreed Value policies and Stated Value policies:

https://www.lelandwest.com/sta...ic-car-insurance.cfm

You're going to want an Agreed Value policy and it's up to you what to value the car at so long as the insurance company agrees the amount isn't ridiculous. They will check similar cars etc to determine if you're asking to insure it for too much. I paid $24K for my car but to replace it would be about $30K so I have my car insured for $30K and the insurance company AGREED to pay me that much if it is a total loss.

First, understand that these are not "real" cars. While you may be spending $30,000 plus, it doesn't buy you the same turn-the-key-and-forget-about-it experience as you get with a modern car of the same cost. As with any low-volume produced item there will be some minor (hopefully) problems in the beginning. And beyond.   

With this in mind, find a local mechanic who specializes in vintage Volkswagens--which is, in a sense, what you own. Become his friend. You'll need him. 

Justin and crew?: Vintage Motorcar, Scottsdale AZ, vintagespeedsters.com (Speedsters at this time)

Greg Leach: Vintage Motorcars, Hawaiian Gardens, CA, vintagespyders.com (Spyders, Speedsters, and coupes, AND all of Kirk's former employees)

There is a difference, and I don't think the Arizona guy picked the name by mistake or chance. Greg has been using the name for a number of years since he was visited upon by the Porsche legal team......

wombat posted:

First, understand that these are not "real" cars. While you may be spending $30,000 plus, it doesn't buy you the same turn-the-key-and-forget-about-it experience as you get with a modern car of the same cost. As with any low-volume produced item there will be some minor (hopefully) problems in the beginning. And beyond.   

With this in mind, find a local mechanic who specializes in vintage Volkswagens--which is, in a sense, what you own. Become his friend. You'll need him. 

Gosh, I guess I shouldn't be spending real money on it.

Just kidding.

They are "real" cars. They are however not what they appear to be if they are wrapped in all the Porsche badging etc.

They are a different ownership experience though.

 

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×
×