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I've been changing my oil and filter every 3,000 miles. With full flow oil filters is that really necessary? The oil still looks fairly clean at 3,000. I'm running Rotella T-4.

The recommended oil change interval on my Boxter was 15,000 with laboratory oil.

I'm expecting at least 50 replies. Just saying

Last edited by Jim Gilbert - Madison, Mississippi
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On my daily I change oil and filter every 5k miles even if the car says it can go another 10k.  On the Speedster I changed it every 3k or so since I figure the oil is carrying a bigger part of the load in an air-cooled car.  I had a full-flow system with external cooler and filter.  Maybe it's not necessary, but it's cheap insurance.  I would check and adjust valves if necessary at the same time.

On the Coupe I haven't changed the oil yet at only ~300 miles open a water-cooled Subaru.  I expect that I'll stick to a 5k schedule.

Last edited by Lane Anderson

I suspect this will evolve into a conversation about what is the best airfilter and airfilter location, the best oil, the benefits of full flow, dry sumping and oil change frequency.

ZDDP, oil coolers  and oil cooler locations and types of oil cooler plumbing will also come into play etc., ad infinitum.

In the end, there may be some valuable, verifiable facts come out of the exercise and a number of impressions, feelings and beliefs, and maybe some charts!

Rev your respective opinion engines ladies and gentlemen and let the games begin.

I'd be curious to see a lab analysis of oil used in a modded T1 engine.  Oil now is definitely better than non-detergent 30W running thru a T1 fly screen filter.  I still remember the oil ad: "pay me now or pay me later; oil is cheap, iron is not"

FRAM introduced its iconic slogan, “You can pay me now, or pay me later” in 1970.

I used to change my oil dino oil and dump it on the loose stone driveway of my parents house!  Don't tell EPA - hopefully the limits of prosecution are long passed.

I change my own oil (still).  On my new cars with full synthetic oil I go 1 year or 10 thousand miles.  I suspect I could go 12-15k with hi-end oil and filter now that I'm out of warranty.

Last edited by WOLFGANG

@Jim Gilbert - Madison, Mississippi I've often wondered that as well. Today's oil is worlds better than what it used to be. The only difference between my daily driver oil and my speedster oil is the Speedster oil has a much higher concentration of additives. (I think) I change my truck oil and Nancy's oil when the computer in the car says to. Her Porsche is 12 months or 10K miles and my truck is 15K miles.

I'm curious as to what the collective says but in the meantime I'll see if any molecular experts have weighed in on this.

I’m with Lane. I change my DD’s every 5K and new filter every 10K. I assay all my oil changes and everything is still in spec.

I used to own a BMW F650 with a Rotax single cylinder engine. I used Motul semi-synth in it because that was the factory recommendation. Interval was 6K, but I swear to god, almost as the odometer rolled over 5K the motor would sound like a box of racks and it was constantly slipping out of second gear after a 1-2 shift.


Change the oil and it was good as new.



Wolfgang, I change my Spyder oil annually and rarely get even 3,000 miles on it. The assays look good but have a little elevated aluminum in them. I’ve been using Rotella 40wt but  I switched to 20W-50 this year. We’ll see how that works.

@edsnova posted:

Once you find oil that "works," never, ever change it. The dirtier it gets the better it flows. As I've said often here, I've had excellent luck so far with straight 3-in1.

100%......next thing they'll be telling us is that we should adjust the valves.



In all seriousness, I've been keeping with a 3,000mi interval.  The oil usually comes out almost the same color as it goes in.  I also adjust the valves at the same time....even though there's not much adjusting.

@dlearl476 posted:

A “CB Performance 2L” was all the info the PO had.

A LOT of Beck Spyders got either a 1915cc or a 2165cc. It's probably the latter. If you ever pull the heads you'll be able to know for sure.

Unless you put it at BDC, remove the rockers, and fill the cylinder through the spark plug hole. That would give a pretty good ballpark, just multiply by 4.

@Stan Galat posted:

I wish I had your hearing. I wear hearing aids and have zero ability to hear valve-clatter, as it falls in my "dead-zone" frequency. I check them when I change the oil.

I hear you on that one, wearing amplification helps but high frequency sounds like squeaks valve clatter is unobtainable and really does impair your life.  It’s the same with eyesight but at least readers help or task glasses.  This getting old is for the birds.

To make it a legal post,  I change the oil in my subie IM every 3k with new filter. I have been using Penzoil full synthetic 5w30 pretty much since I got it.  My subie tech guys uses 5w40 Gulf FSyn and suggested for subies it helps with oil consumption I may give it a try.
All my DD at their recommended intervals or yearly. The only vehicle that got done at the dealer was my Odyssey it was so cheap but the price recently doubled with this last prison sentence

@550 Phil posted:

08178B9E-F681-4325-A625-2A5080E72048Many Suby sites swear to this stuff. So that’s what I use. Changed oil after 100 miles. Then at 1000. Still waiting for 4000. Probably should do it yearly. Or maybe start driving the Spyder more. Doesn’t get much use in the summer since I live at the beach and the car is in the mountains.

Ram diesels love this oil but 15w/40   5w is pretty thin unless ur in Antartica..probably a good choice 5w40..thats  the weight what Por people run in their 991s..but alot like Motul 5w40

@barncobob posted:

Ram diesels love this oil but 15w/40   5w is pretty thin unless ur in Antartica..probably a good choice 5w40..thats  the weight what Por people run in their 991s..but alot like Motul 5w40

You're missing the point of multi grade oils, Bob- it's only thin at start up, where even 5w doesn't flow immediately through the tight bearing clearances most engines are built with today.  Whether the ambient temp is -10 or 105°, at start up the engine is cold and an oil with a lower 1st number will flow, lubricate surfaces and carry away heat sooner than an oil that acts thicker when cold.  The current trend with most car manufacturers is to use the same (low first number) weight oil year-round because they've realized that ambient temp doesn't really have much of an affect on an engine's running/performance parameters.

Last edited by ALB
@DannyP posted:

A LOT of Beck Spyders got either a 1915cc or a 2165cc. It's probably the latter. If you ever pull the heads you'll be able to know for sure.

Unless you put it at BDC, remove the rockers, and fill the cylinder through the spark plug hole. That would give a pretty good ballpark, just multiply by 4.

According to the CA registration plate, mine originally had a 1600. It was also a kit. I think the PO put a used CB engine in when he “restored” it.

Ive thought about measuring it, but I’ll wait until it needs something involving a tear down. I suspect it’s got a 2165.  I called CB to see if they could give me any insight, but apparently they don’t keep records.

Last edited by dlearl476
@ALB posted:

You're missing the point of multi grade oils, Bob- it's only thin at start up, where even 5w doesn't flow immediately through the tight bearing clearances most engines are built with today.  Whether the ambient temp is -10 or 105°, at start up the engine is cold and an oil with a lower 1st number will flow, lubricate surfaces and carry away heat sooner than an oil that acts thicker when cold.  The current trend with most car manufacturers is to use the same (low first number) weight oil year-round because they've realized that ambient temp doesn't really have much of an affect on an engine's running/performance parameters.

UHM I guess,,UR the expert..Im gonna stick with what the Porsche engineers recommend for my 17 C2S twin turbo 480 HP

im not running this beast on 5W oil

I also wonder what oil and re-lube intervals I should be using on the chain and derailleurs on my bicycle?

I’ve already committed biker heresy by using a can of Gum-out carb cleaner to clean my chain (screw the biker purists…..It works)

Do I need an oil with added zinc and phosphorous, too?  Will a 5-weight stand up to the pressure on the chain rollers or should I be using a 10-weight?  Or how about a multi-visc for riding worry-free in different temperatures, like cold mornings and hot afternoons??  

Are the modern oils better for my chain than the low melt paraffin I used to use in the 1980’s?  Can I get more than a week between re-lubes with the new oils?  And lastly, which oil should I be using to minimize dust pick-up from the road?  

Inquiring bikers need to know….  

.

You know, this thread wasn't drifting nearly as much as an oil thread should, but the irrelevant turn towards bicycle chains just might do the trick, if we hammer on it hard enough. Opinions about chain lube are like bicycle seats - everyone has one.

Not surprisingly, I do, too. And, as is befitting thread drift, my opinion is based strongly on narrow, personal experience. No science. No control groups. No double-blind testing. No impartiality. I just know what I know and am convinced. And that is the stuff that quality thread drift is made of.

I've been cycling, off and on, for about 40 years, not counting my adolescent Schwinn years. OK, it's been probably more off than on, but still. I've done some cycle touring in Europe. I once crossed Ireland in one day (please, don't look at a map to see just how far that is - it's only impressive if you think of it as crossing a whole country in one day.)

But my most intensive cycling was in the late '90s, when I was cycle commuting to work - about 35 miles round trip a day, or 175 miles per week, plus club rides on the weekends. So, maybe 1000 miles a month, for about eight months a year - more miles than I was putting on my Miata.

That kind of riding, in a hot, dry climate, means you should be cleaning and lubing your chain (and sprockets) a lot. Which I did.

It was the Age of White Lightning, so I tried that for a while, but didn't like the wax buildup I was getting, so I worked out my own routine, using Tri-Flow. Which everyone knows you shouldn't use as a chain lube. But I did. And it worked.

The thing about bike chains is that keeping them clean - on the inside where it counts - is almost more important than keeping them lubed. It's the abrasion of the dirt that does them in. And sticky lubes attract dirt, which is counterproductive.

My routine was to soak down a dirty chain real well with Tri-Flow and then to hose the whole thing off with water under pressure. Yeah, water. The goal was to get as much of the dirt and crud off the chain as possible. After 15 minutes in our sun and our 12 per cent humidity, a wet chain gets pretty dry. Then, I applied another blast of Tri-Flow to do the actual lubing. But the key to the whole process was finishing off with a really good wipe down of the chain until it was bone dry - on the outside. The only parts of a chain that need lube are the pins and the inner surfaces of the plates that slide across each other.

This worked for me for thousands of miles, with no chain stretch and virtually no sprocket wear. So, this must be the only correct way to lube and maintain a chain.

I'm as certain of it as Musbjim is sure that the best Speedster oil is whatever's on sale at Walmart this month.

.

Last edited by Sacto Mitch

"Chain lube? What is this chain lube you speak of?" This was an actual quote from a customer of ours. I've also seen used motor oil and axle grease used as lube. No bueno.

It really doesn't matter which chain lube you use just as long as you do the final step of wiping off the excess as Mitch has mentioned. Of course, you'll have to clean it first, when needed. Cleaning should also include the pulley wheels, cassette and chain ring or rings.

As far as bike saddles. You find one that fits your a$$ bones and you buy three of them, because they'll change it next season.

Exactly, Carlos. That last step of wiping it down? Yeah I did that too. Especially easy when the wax is just starting to cool off. Paraffin for the win!

I have some of those nice skinny and curved brushes to clean between the cogs.

I used to use citrus cleaner on all my bike stuff. We had gallon jugs at work that nobody used, and it was a shame to leave it sitting on the shelf like that.

All is well. This is going about like I had expected. Let me assist.

Olive Oil is my favorite. Only virgin if that's still possible.

I've been riding BMW's for 50 years. No damn chains.

When I was very young I always had to go to work with my Dad. I had a younger brother that my mother really wanted to be a girl, so he got to stay home. She nearly got her wish. I never had a summer to be a kid. Learned to ride a bicycle, finally, at 12. Bought a Sears Moped at 15 with my own money ($40); end of bicycles.

I guess the general non consensus is to change the oil and filter and adjust the valves  at 3,000 miles. It's comforting to know some things don't change.

Carry on...

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