Sir @Gordon Nichols prepared an excellent post on "Spares for the Road" years ago.

I converted it to an Amazon Wishlist to make it easier to build my road kit. I think you all might make use of it as well. If you see something recommended that doesn't make sense, please let me know.

Amazon Wishlist

 

I gave the list to my family too so they can help me build my road kit over time. I'm hoping to make a significant dent in the list on Black Friday.

http://amzn.to/2AREl4U

Original Post

 

Ryan, one of the most common problems with these cars that can happen at any time and leave you stranded (or limping along) is dirt in the idle jets.

It's best to prepare ahead of time how you're going to deal with this. The fix is to pull the jets, one at a time, blow them out with spray carb cleaner, and then blow out the cavities in the sides of the carbs that you pulled them out of.

Besides the spray can of cleaner, you need to know where the jets are and how to get them out. The jet holders on Weber (and EMPI) carbs have hex heads, with slots for a flat-bladed screw driver. They're nasty to get at this way in our cars because of the limited clearance available. (Even the stubbiest screw driver can be too long.)

You can fit a set of jet holders from JayCee, that have allen-key recesses. These are much easier to remove and replace, since you'll be mostly working by feel when you do this.

So, learn where the jets are now (in the comfort of a warm, well-lit garage), put on the allen-key jet holders before you get stuck out somewhere, carry the right allen key with you, and also have a can of carb cleaner in your kit. You'll have to get the whole can down in the space between the carb and the engine side wall in order to blow out the carb bodies, so the smaller the can, the better.

If you're confused by any of this, Tony can run you through the drill.

 

 

 

One time I showed up at a SLO gathering and someone needed an engine tin gasket. I just happened to have one in the support vehicle.  I donated it to the cause. That made me giggle. 

Whos car was that again? Ivory white speedster. VW N Tux license plate. Powder coated wheels. I think he sold that car to fund a bus project. Was his name Mitch?

The point is that it doesnt hurt to carry a little extra for a friend in need.

TRP posted:

One time I showed up at a SLO gathering and someone needed an engine tin gasket. I just happened to have one in the support vehicle.  I donated it to the cause. That made me giggle. 

Whos car was that again? Ivory white speedster. VW N Tux license plate. Powder coated wheels. I think he sold that car to fund a bus project. Was his name Mitch?

The point is that it doesnt hurt to carry a little extra for a friend in need.

That sounds like @BlakeAndJen They sold the Speedster and bought a bus project. License was BUGNTUX if I remember correctly. Thought they were going to join us last June for the 2017 Cruise but they weren't able to make it.

What essential spares do you bring with you on long road trips?

In preparation for my next trip down the coast, I'm adding to my Road Trip spares list. That list is pretty exhaustive. What do you actually bring with you?

I just came across this old post from @WildBill. He seems to do a good job with spares. What do you keep in your trunk?

I have three different spares carriers, depending on what's in them:

1.  Tool bag #1:  12mm, 13mm, 14mm, 15mm box/open end wrenches plus 10-12-14-15mm sockets, Multi-tip magnetic screwdriver, compact spark plug socket and extension, 3/8" drive ratchet, pair of medium waterpump pliers (use as emergency crimp tool), several tie-wraps, spare spark plug (Gapped), distributor cap and rotor.

2.  Goodie Bag #2:  "Snail" carb sync tool, pair of walkie talkies (for group rides) plus their charger, 2 micro-fiber towels, Stop Light Prism (wrapped up in one of the towels), several pairs of ear plugs, LED flashlight, small leatherman tool, wine bottle opener, tire pressure gauge, dipstick thermometer, manual for the ridiculously complicated radio.

3.  Spares bin under hood:  Set of points and condenser (and my car doesn't even use them!), valve cover gasket, sump gasket, spare relay, roll of mechanic's wire, roll of 16ga electrical wire, long and medium length plug wires, coil wire (can also use a plug wire), small bag of nuts/bolts/screws (metric), small bag of crimp connectors, clutch cable, throttle cable, 1 each misc bulbs (except headlights).  Car fuse spares are in my fuse/relay panel.  Spare fuses (2 and unique) for the heater are in a labeled bag.

I also carry a small First Aid kit under the hood.  The fire extinguisher is in the driver's door right behind my left elbow (heater and engine both have Blaze Cut suppressors).

I carry no spare tire (no room) so I have a 12 volt compressor and a tire plug kit.

I used to carry a windshield de-fogger (small sponge wrapped in chamois leather) but haven't needed that since I installed the heater.

I have used this stuff a lot over the years, usually to fix someone else's car (like at Carlisle), but at least I have the stuff when they need it.

The only thing I add for long-ish trips is a box with a complete distributor with all plug wires attached, already timed to just drop in and go.

Just a reminder for those of you with existing spares kits:  If there are things in your kit that are perishable, like batteries or stuff in your first aid kit, please check them now for "freshness" and replace, if questionable, before the season starts (this applies to you SoCal "summer is always here" guys, too).  

Nothing worse than stopping to help someone and something you need is dead, out of date or questionable.

And don't forget to check BOTH the pressure AND date code on your hand fire extinguishers and replace if necessary.  Any fire department in America can let you know if you have a good or questionable fire extinguisher riding with you.

Trust me......You want a good one. 

That is a long Amazon list. Any list that has duct tape needs a BFH (big @#+&™✓£ hammer). 

In addition to many of the things others have listed, I keep a spare alternator belt, throttle cable, twist tie wire for the Jets, spark plugs and 1 wire, one of those USB charger units and a pretty cool vintage traveling bar. 

I am sure there is a lot more and I will have a emergency vehicle for SOC. Not enough space in the Spyder for the wife's luggage

You nevah know, on a long trip, when you're gonna be out of Cell Phone range and if anything happens there, Heaven forbid, you're toast.

Maybe you need to borrow my old EPIRB from my boat (heck.....I'm not using it!).  Get it out, splash some beer on it and sit back, waiting for the Coast Guard to arrive, wondering what the hell a boat is doing 150 miles from the closest body of water.   

Add Reply

Likes (0)
Post Content
×
×
×
×
×