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I have an ongoing problem with oil temps in my Beck.  It was around 80 in Atlanta yesterday and had it on the expressway for about 10 miles at between 3000 and 3500 rpm and the gauge got up to 250, and that was with the heater valve turned on.  I pushed it off and the temp began to climb even higher.  Nothing is clogging the radiator and my radiator and oil are full, Ideas anyone

Meade

Original Post

I wonder if your system has air in it and there is low circulation.  

A procedure that I added to my yearly start up is to have the system integrity verified.

My suggestion is to start by making sure to Tighten every clamp etc. This will make sure the system is not leaking at any spot. 

Then have the system bled, completely every start, of every season.   This will make sure the system is not low in fluid which it may not be low in fluid as Carey has a very straight path to his one radiator he uses in his setup. 

My setup is more complicated with 2 radiators and a lot of highs and lows in the coolant tubing travel so I had to do it to rule out other issues I had with the cooling system.  

BTW All of them were fixed, resolved, since I added a second overflow tank but I continue to get it done yearly... just in case.  

Different powertrain brings different issues and a learning curve but I hands down like and would choose again the Subie engine, torque, power and tranny more than my 2110cc  3:44 type I ... any day. 

P.S.  I added a temperature sensor with a buzzer to alert me of high temp for the engine and tranny. 

P.P.S. Check your oil it probably got consumed a little, instead of the coolant when it hit 250.  Just saying.

 

@Meade

Last edited by IaM-Ray

Have you asked Carey? He knows the Suby cars inside and out. He is the first one I call if my Suby has an issue. As you may know I have a similar setup as yours in my Fiberfab Speedster. The water pump may be failing and not moving the coolant well. You thermostat my be stuck partially open. Your gauge may be wrong (doubtful but possible) the radiator may be dirty or obstructed. Your brakes could be dragging causing the engine to labor harder than usual (I know it is doubtful but things that I have seen) Have you read the ECU via the OBDII port for any codes? Good luck, I hope you get it figured out. Please let me know what it turns out being, it may happen to me in the future.

Last edited by Jimmy V.

Meade,

Coolant temps and oil temps are linked, so please provide more info on your situation.  When you oil temp gauge shows 250, what does your coolant temp gauge show?  

I would check the accuracy of your sending unit and oil temp gauge by using a hand-held temp gauge that you insert in the dipstick.  Since you have a Subi engine, you may be able to check oil temps using your OBDII port also.

Synthetic oil can withstand oil temps far higher than 250 without significant shearing, and dino oils are almost as good.  How many miles on the oil in the engine and what weight? Synth or dino?

Many times, the most difficult part of the car "fix" is determining what is actually wrong.  Describing the symptom, i.e., hot oil, is not describing the problem.  Installing an oil cooler will lower oil temps, but it would be nice to know first if your oil is really at 250F.  

When you turn on your heater during hot oil events, you are actually installing a secondary radiator in your system, the heater core, so your coolant is able to shed additional heat, and your oil temp drops. 

As others have stated, Carey is likely your best source for gold-plated info.

 

Last edited by Jim Kelly

Carey, thanks for the offer if Mike is coming down to see Chuck.  DEFINITELY have him stop by or tell me where to meet him.  I have a garage where he can look at it.  THANKS A TON!!

Thanks to all of you guys who came forth with suggestions; I keep on meaning to check with my wife's cooking thermometer on the oil and I'm going to try the unit that Ray suggested. My dash is already desecrated with gauges anyway...

@Meade posted:

Carey, thanks for the offer if Mike is coming down to see Chuck.  DEFINITELY have him stop by or tell me where to meet him.  I have a garage where he can look at it.  THANKS A TON!!

Thanks to all of you guys who came forth with suggestions; I keep on meaning to check with my wife's cooking thermometer on the oil and I'm going to try the unit that Ray suggested. My dash is already desecrated with gauges anyway...

Some put it in the engine compartment or hide it out of sight.  

I put mine under the dash and I have to bend down a bit to see it like at a stop light but the buzzer is an extra feature that allows you to hide it, subtly  

(BTW, I ordered the DUAL sensor and I installed one sensor on one cylinder head, and the other on the tranny using a bolt hole at the mid line. I really gives you an idea how long it takes for the oil temperature to get to full operating temperature)

 

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Last edited by IaM-Ray

@Meade you should be able to buy them on ebay BUT look at the sensor cable direction, where it comes out, it usually comes out on the side.  

I took mine apart and gently drilled and moved it to the back and used JBweld to seal up the side hole and a little touch up paint hid everything. 

I found out that you can ORDER THE cable direction if you call them in Australia. 

BTW I don't know why he can't ship it maybe he thinks your in the Georgia  which is in Russia or somewhere like that  

@Meade posted:

I finally got the gauge ordered, and it should get here within the next century... The Aussies apparently have a pony-express type mail system, but I've been in contact with the president of the company and we've had very pleasant conversations.

One of the foremost suppliers of parts for old Ducati single motorcycles is in Australia. They use a shipper akin to the Royal Mail and it rarely takes more than two weeks to get anything from them.  Usually, it's closer to one week. Depends on how busy Customs is and how big/complicated the part is. 

Customs: As former trucker for 49 years,  I can weigh in on the craziness … I've sat 9 hours to pick up a flatbed trailer load  full of palletized nails, when they finally got to "inspecting " the 20 shrink wrapped pallets Customs tore open a 3" corner of a top carton and that was it.  Fun  fact:  Custom's only has the manpower to inspect 13% of both import  and export sea going steel containers, so 87% of all freight of every kind goes unchecked....So much for secure Ports. 

Last edited by Alan Merklin

My wife and I once purchased some antique iron garden urns in the Cotswolds in England. Not small, not light and not cheap. It took almost six months to get them shipped to Chicago where we lived, and when they were delivered the Customs fees were almost what the darned things cost us originally.

I've hauled those stupid things all over the country, Chicago to Flagstaff to D.C. to Chicago to Peoria to Florida. They have cost my employer a mint to continually move because of their weight, (all but the last move were corporate relocations)  but kept my marriage intact as leaving these treasures behind would have upset a certain blonde close to me.

Buy American.

Last edited by Panhandle Bob
@Bob: IM S6 posted:

All mail systems are delayed these days with Covid19.  Patience is required.

... to be sure.

You may recall that the twin-plug engine ingested some molten carb parts a couple of years ago. This is one of the primary drivers behind the 2234 project chronicled elsewhere on this site.

What does this have to do with this thread? Shipping and customs in an age of COVID.

I bought my Intermccanica as a roller, which played to my strengths, and hid my weaknesses (I'm no body man). As time has rolled on-- I (very belatedly) realized that the things I want to do with a replica are too widely varied for one vehicle to be everything I'd like it to be. This cleared some things up, and gave me a clear path with the car I own to make it very, very good at one thing (a GT). The twin-plug engine was just too highly strung to power a GT and not strung highly enough to power something truly frightening.

The idea of something much more raw-boned (an extremely light, extremely powerful, single purpose Speedster) is the genesis of Project X-- the car I hope to build in my retirement. I've wanted to build a car from the ground up since I was 12 years old. If I am ever going to do this, I need to start gathering the hard to find and expensive parts now. If I wait until I have no income, I won't do it.

The twin-plug motor needed torn down anyhow, so it seemed like a good time to begin rebuilding it into something considerably more brutal. The heads were a compromise when I did them, but since they needed torn down and redone anyhow, I decided to have them massaged by Torben Alstrup from Denmark. Torben is a regular contributor on TheSamba, and one of the guys who really has my attention. Torben has a day job, but also has a very complete shop. With COVID, he had the time to fix, and redo the twin-plug heads. The planets lined up.

I boxed up the twin-plug heads in March, and sent them via USPS air-mail. UPS and FedEx wanted $800+ to ship them (screw that). DHL wanted $650, and also for us to be BFFs (I don't want to get married, I want to send a box). Enter the good 'ol postal system, who would do it for $450! I was a genius shopper! I built the box to end all boxes, and sent them off with a USPS tracking number. My customs declaration was just as Torben had instructed me to fill it out. I insured the package for the maximum amount available ($650), and was promised a 6 day delivery.

I sent them off on March 20. They have not been seen in Denmark (or anywhere else) yet.

Of course I tracked them (as well as anybody can track anything through the USPS). They went to St. Louis and sat there for a week. Then they went to Chicago's "export facility". Then they dropped off the face of the earth. More than 70 days have elapsed, and nobody can tell me where my heads are. I had the postmaster try to track it. He told me, "sorry". I started filing a claim, but they want proof of value, and I've yet to find my (5 year old) receipt for the heads. I just want them to show up in Denmark.

I'm not super-high on the international postal system right now.

My wife and I once purchased some antique iron garden urns in the Cotswolds in England. Not small, not light and not cheap. It took almost six months to get them shipped to Chicago where we lived, and when they were delivered the Customs fees were almost what the darned things cost us originally.

I've hauled those stupid things all over the country, Chicago to Flagstaff to D.C. to Chicago to Peoria to Florida. They have cost my employer a mint to continually move because of their weight, (all but the last move were corporate relocations)  but kept my marriage intact as leaving these treasures behind would have upset a certain blonde close to me.

Buy American.

I guess this qualifies with keeping oil temperature lower... 

Panhandle Bob, I hear yah.  We never dragged anything significant back from Europe, but we once found a large, teak porch swing on Martha's Vineyard that we just HAD to have. Carried it onto the ferry (we had left our car on the mainland) , carried it off of the ferry, stuffed it into the back of a Ford Explorer and got it home with the liftgate ajar.  Where it sat in the garage for a few years.

Then we moved everything, including the swing, to Rhode Island.....   Where it sat for a few more years.  Then we moved everything to South Carolina, including the swing, where, once again, it sat in the garage until I was getting vibes like, we'll never use that thing, we should just sell it".  So I bought a few pressure treated 4" X 4"s and built a sturdy frame for it and finally got it set up somewhere useful - where we could look out on this just about every night, which became a ritual:

And what made it even cooler, was that the view in the photo is just to the right from looking southeast  across Hilton Head Island so we could sit in the swing with our wine and occasionally watch the Space Shuttle go up.  That was über cool.

Long ago in a mindset far, far away............

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@Stan Galat posted:

... to be sure.

You may recall that the twin-plug engine ingested some molten carb parts a couple of years ago. This is one of the primary drivers behind the 2234 project chronicled elsewhere on this site.

What does this have to do with this thread? Shipping and customs in an age of COVID.

I bought my Intermccanica as a roller, which played to my strengths, and hid my weaknesses (I'm no body man). As time has rolled on-- I (very belatedly) realized that the things I want to do with a replica are too widely varied for one vehicle to be everything I'd like it to be. This cleared some things up, and gave me a clear path with the car I own to make it very, very good at one thing (a GT). The twin-plug engine was just too highly strung to power a GT and not strung highly enough to power something truly frightening.

The idea of something much more raw-boned (an extremely light, extremely powerful, single purpose Speedster) is the genesis of Project X-- the car I hope to build in my retirement. I've wanted to build a car from the ground up since I was 12 years old. If I am ever going to do this, I need to start gathering the hard to find and expensive parts now. If I wait until I have no income, I won't do it.

The twin-plug motor needed torn down anyhow, so it seemed like a good time to begin rebuilding it into something considerably more brutal. The heads were a compromise when I did them, but since they needed torn down and redone anyhow, I decided to have them massaged by Torben Alstrup from Denmark. Torben is a regular contributor on TheSamba, and one of the guys who really has my attention. Torben has a day job, but also has a very complete shop. With COVID, he had the time to fix, and redo the twin-plug heads. The planets lined up.

I boxed up the twin-plug heads in March, and sent them via USPS air-mail. UPS and FedEx wanted $800+ to ship them (screw that). DHL wanted $650, and also for us to be BFFs (I don't want to get married, I want to send a box). Enter the good 'ol postal system, who would do it for $450! I was a genius shopper! I built the box to end all boxes, and sent them off with a USPS tracking number. My customs declaration was just as Torben had instructed me to fill it out. I insured the package for the maximum amount available ($650), and was promised a 6 day delivery.

I sent them off on March 20. They have not been seen in Denmark (or anywhere else) yet.

Of course I tracked them (as well as anybody can track anything through the USPS). They went to St. Louis and sat there for a week. Then they went to Chicago's "export facility". Then they dropped off the face of the earth. More than 70 days have elapsed, and nobody can tell me where my heads are. I had the postmaster try to track it. He told me, "sorry". I started filing a claim, but they want proof of value, and I've yet to find my (5 year old) receipt for the heads. I just want them to show up in Denmark.

I'm not super-high on the international postal system right now.

Geez, Stan. You could have flown to Denmark with them in your carry on for that. And met Torban in person.  

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