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I know that I’m not the first “new guy” to ask about the infamous, coveted, & elusive SOC badge…  You know what I’m talking about, the "Live fast, Die Young; Leave a beautiful corpse” badge:
 
Live%20Die%20Fast%20Badge
 
It seems like there’s next to zero chance of getting my hands on one of few ever made (although I’d love to know if someone’s willing to part with theirs).  I love the colors and styling, matches my car AND my other badge perfectly.  Is there any chance that there’ll be another batch run, or are these intentionally left exclusive?
 
Whether exclusive or not, I know there was some controversy over the statement, so might I suggest a new edition, in the same style but reading “Live fast, Die Old; Leave a beautiful car”?  I have to say, this actually resonates with me more.  I admit I also like the "dad joke" quality of it.  
 
I don't even know what it takes to make them:  who organizes/manages it, where they're made, what they cost, what the history of such discussions is, etc.  So please excuse my naivete if I'm walking right into something...

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  • Live fast, Die Young; Leave a beautiful corpse Badge
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"Scarcer than Hen's teeth" would be an apt description.  They're about as scarce as the 2006 Carlisle grill badges that I had only 52 made:

Based on my notes, the SOC badge would be relatively inexpensive to make, as it has only two colors over the machined or cast base metal.  The Carlisle badge had 7 colors and pretty tight details.  It was commissioned to a guy in Wisconsin, designed by an SOC member in Canada, was tooled in Scotland and produced on Taiwan.  All-in costs for everything and amortized over the 52 piece lot was a shade under $30 each.  All of them were distributed back then.

@Rich Drewek on here did an different SOC badge a few years back and might have some insight on who he used and relative costs.

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  • mceclip0

 

We're going to need a bigger badge.

Since the original badge was made, the SOC lawyer has reviewed our legal exposure, and he's insisting on the following language on any future club badge:

"Live quickly, but at a speed deemed appropriate by any local jurisdictions through which you pass while engaged in a club-sanctioned event or activity, do not encourage minors, dependents, or impaired individuals to take any action which might endanger their health or wellbeing, and dispose of any potentially harmful refuse responsibly, according to applicable local statutes and within the recommendations of appropriate regulatory agencies"

 

Last edited by Sacto Mitch

Based on my notes, the SOC badge would be relatively inexpensive to make, as it has only two colors over the machined or cast base metal.  The Carlisle badge had 7 colors and pretty tight details.  It was commissioned to a guy in Wisconsin, designed by an SOC member in Canada, was tooled in Scotland and produced on Taiwan.  All-in costs for everything and amortized over the 52 piece lot was a shade under $30 each.  All of them were distributed back then.

Wow, that's not bad at all, I expected that it would be more.  Especially considering that the run-of-the-mill generics on Amazon/eBay are around that price point.  Sounds like it was quite the international job, definitely took more than a village.  But also sounds doable...

@barncobob posted:

luv the square drive screws for security from the average IQ thieves..

Agreed, although with just the right sized flathead or similar-shaped piece of metal, someone could still fit that drive pattern diagonally.  I looked around for security / tamper proof screws myself.  Because they're already a unique item, I didn't find many that were in the form factor needed, and especially not bronze / copper toned.  I'd be interested to know where that screw is from, perhaps they have other patterns...

I got lucky with these binding posts I had laying around, perfect color, and the binding post end didn't have a drive pattern but instead just cylindrical hole (they usually do):  

IMG_4191 copyIMG_4192 copy

The problem is that someone smart/observant enough could simply unscrew my entire grille and walk away with the entire safe.  Twofer deal.  So I still need to find a security for my grille, but again, it may be tough because it's not a common size.

Would love to know what others have done.  ESPECIALLY if this new badge is made, I'm not risking having that stolen...  Might have to buy in multiple...

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  • Porsche 356 Registry badge w/ binding posts
  • Binding posts
Last edited by Sean Seena

Let’s take a poll:

How many owners on here have had either your grill or grill badges stolen?  

If I had to worry about it, I'd move further out.

Right now, the work van full of tools and stock is parked on the street, unlocked, with the keys in it. Limo too. We're leaving town for a friend's daughter's wedding tomorrow. I'll probably just leave everything there. Jeanie may lock the front door, but the garage is always open.

Your mileage may vary.

@Eric (McGruff) The clown car stickers do, indeed, exist!!  
I printed my own on static cling stock from the image on here (in fact, we had several different versions over about a week) but since I have an el Cheapo printer, the colors quickly washed in the sun.

@Sacto Mitch made up a few of them and sent them out to us lucky (and slightly twisted) people.  If you, too, are lucky (and do some groveling at his feet) he might have one or two still kicking around to send to you for some astronomical fee like, a few bucks or so.   Personally, I got extras and have them on my DDs, too.   Now, if I could get a “Plastic Bike” version (for my plastic bicycle, of course) I would be in sticker Nirvana.....

 

@Eric (McGruff)

Eric, an extensive search through my archives turned up a few of the stickers.

These are first edition copies, so will be worth a small fortune to future collectors.

They were also sitting on my desk at the exact moment I first viewed an online photo of Stan Galat's three-seat Cadillac limo. So, there's that, too. Provenance casts an intoxicating spell over collectors.

Send me a PM if you're still interested after reading this.

 

Chris and I went to a C&C yesterday.  Great turn-out for the end of the season with 40-50 cars there, everything from a Model T touring car to a bunch of Porsches to a couple of Ferraris (and one Alpha Giulia, for Mr. Gryzkanowiscowski-xyz  --  Nice paint, BTW, Marty)

I was parked just behind one of the 911s which happened to have a 2" PCA sticker in the bottom corner of the windshield - same place I have my Clown sticker.  People would look at the 911, then wander back to Pearl and do a double-take at the sticker and laugh like hell.

I love it.

Good to hear no badge theft issues.  Sort of makes sense, in that these cars spend a higher percentage of their time in lower crime environments as compared to a modern/errand car (e.g., parked in front of the cafe you're having coffee at, a winery, a C&C, or w/ friends, etc.).  That and there are constant eyeballs on the car from every passerby.  And to @DannyP's point, I think most people don't even know what to steal from these cars haha, at least upon first impression while they're still dazzled.  I'd just be worried about the rare guy who wants to collect a badge the same way they "collect" a street sign.

Whether for this or in general, I'd be curious to learn of any good security screw sources.  For example, I came across these guys https://www.albanycountyfasten...tant-Screw-s/859.htm (because their videos on YouTube show up quickly), they're cool but not totally exhaustive.  E.g., I think no brass/bronze/copper colored security screws.

@Bob: IM S6 Ah thanks.  I've seen them before but didn't know the name nor any backstory.  Just read a Wikipedia blurb on it "Robertson screws are commonplace in Canada, though they have been used elsewhere and have become much more common in other countries. As patents expired and awareness of their advantages spread...".  Interesting bit wrt Ford's encounter with them.  I always found it funny that slot/flathead was the main screw drive for so long (probably makes sense in terms of easier/cheaper manufacturing), and it took so long to figure out others by people who are by definition pretty handy.  Like a Robertson, which is literally a square peg vs round hole!!  Ok fine it was over a 100 yrs ago but still.

@Gordon Nichols Serendipity or synchronicity with this post??  Did the 911 owner notice what was going on?...

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