Skip to main content

No, if you have the very old brass inner bushing it requires the also very old bakelite bushing carrier.  The Micarta inner bushings are a direct replacement for both inner bushings and carriers and don't have their own carrier, they insert into the beam raw dog.

That said, I got SO TIRED of dealing with he aftermarket JUNK quality of the inner micartas blowing apart, our cars with front beams now feature Airkewld beams with Delrin inserts replacing the bearing and Micarta.  Cost me 3x as much to build a front beam, but  ride quality is greatly improved and Im going on year 4 without a single replacement bushing required...

Thanks, @chines1 for the useful lesson.

So now it appears what maybe happened is the Bakelite disintegrated—or the Micarta replacements did. 

Presumably I've got the same in all four corners which means I'm back to the Delrin stuff if I don't want to use the sand rail solution (Sorry, @Gordon Nichols, I don't. I actually bought and then, after reading up on them, gave away a set of those urethane sleeves years ago.)

It would have been really helpful for Cip1 to include a note on the page with those inner bushings, to the effect of, "Caution, you must use the correct bushing carriers for these, NLA." 

I love to waste $80 plus two weeks.

@chines1 posted:

No, if you have the very old brass inner bushing it requires the also very old bakelite bushing carrier.  The Micarta inner bushings are a direct replacement for both inner bushings and carriers and don't have their own carrier, they insert into the beam raw dog.

That said, I got SO TIRED of dealing with he aftermarket JUNK quality of the inner micartas blowing apart, our cars with front beams now feature Airkewld beams with Delrin inserts replacing the bearing and Micarta.  Cost me 3x as much to build a front beam, but  ride quality is greatly improved and Im going on year 4 without a single replacement bushing required...

Way to go Carrey, that is so helpful to so many I am sure. 

I have nothing useful, or even philosophical to add, other than to say I'm really sorry, man. 

Experience is the teacher who always gives the lesson after you've already failed the test. Nobody should have to go through this sort of thing, but anybody who does anything does. You are a doer. As such, you get smacked down, get up, dust off, and get smacked down again. Such is the lot of the builder of things.

You sir, are the man. 

Discussed matters with my buddy who has been a machinist for 30 years and builds Bugs and stuff in his spare time. He's never had a VW beam "this far apart." He offered to turn me up a carrier out of aluminum. I told him what Carey said, above, and we thought about what the other three corners of the beam held in store. All agree the best option is to R&R all the bushings and bearings in the beam with white Delrin. Ordered same.

I'll see if Cip1 will take back the unused bronze bushings and the one bearing I bought. 

Last edited by edsnova

It adjusts from a little smaller than 36mm to 38mm so that should be right. @dlearl476 I plan to write up the beam job on my blog.

@Stan Galat you'd fit right in this neighborhood. Retired GM forewoman and cable lineman next door on one side, truck driver the other. There's a plumber and two HVAC guys just up the street, three welders, two cops, several retired Bethlehem Steel workers...

We've got a Ham radio guy. Many, many boats.

There were two solid 10-second drag cars parked in driveways when I moved here, plus a big block Chevelle, a tribute Yenko Nova, and some other stuff I forget. One of the drag cars is gone now, and the guy sold the Nova (but still has the Chevelle). This is just stuff you see outside of garages. Also car trailers, two scrappers (Sandy and a guy whose name I don't know).

The guy who lent the reamer, Johnny, runs a diesel engine repair and machine shop in S. Baltimore. I believe he specializes in "glider" jobs. He flew into Carlisle last year in his little Cessna and met up with his step son, who drove his dune buggy up. Some of you might have met them though they were only on the field for a little while.

Johnny's good people, despite his enthusiasm for our current POTUS. He and his wife (just married, though you'd never have guessed they weren't married even 10 years ago), spent their honeymoon near and on Mt. Rushmore so they could attend the rally.

I first asked my machinist buddy (actually lives up county) about the reamer and he said his biggest one was under an inch, but found me a good option at $67 plus shipping. I texted Johnny and he got right back to me like "dang, I got every one but that one, mechanic says he took it home."

Then he texted back again 10 minutes later: "found it."

I told him no rush, parts just ordered from the west coast. An hour later he pulls up to his driveway as I'm walking by with the dog, gets out and gives me the box.

This is the same guy who, last spring, after I buggered up my first attempt at replacing Bridget's blown head gaskets, offered to deck the whole engine when I told him my regular machine shop said they couldn't do it without me taking the whole thing down to bare block. 

He backed his truck up my driveway the next morning, helped me load the Suby on the tail gate, and came back the next afternoon to unload it. 

I honestly hope like hell I can do him a favor some day. 

Last edited by edsnova
@edsnova posted:

It adjusts from a little smaller than 36mm to 38mm so that should be right. @dlearl476 I plan to write up the beam job on my blog.

@Stan Galat you'd fit right in this neighborhood. Retired GM forewoman and cable lineman next door on one side, truck driver the other. There's a plumber and two HVAC guys just up the street, three welders, two cops, several retired Bethlehem Steel workers...

We've got a Ham radio guy. Many, many boats.

There were two solid 10-second drag cars parked in driveways when I moved here, plus a big block Chevelle, a tribute Yenko Nova, and some other stuff I forget. One of the drag cars is gone now, and the guy sold the Nova (but still has the Chevelle). This is just stuff you see outside of garages. Also car trailers, two scrappers (Sandy and a guy whose name I don't know).

The guy who lent the reamer, Johnny, runs a diesel engine repair and machine shop in S. Baltimore. I believe he specializes in "glider" jobs. He flew into Carlisle last year in his little Cessna and met up with his step son, who drove his dune buggy up. Some of you might have met them though they were only on the field for a little while.

Johnny's good people, despite his enthusiasm for our current POTUS. He and his wife (just married, though you'd never have guessed they weren't married even 10 years ago), spent their honeymoon near and on Mt. Rushmore so they could attend the rally.

I first asked my machinist buddy (actually lives up county) about the reamer and he said his biggest one was under an inch, but found me a good option at $67 plus shipping. I texted Johnny and he got right back to me like "dang, I got every one but that one, mechanic says he took it home."

Then he texted back again 10 minutes later: "found it."

I told him no rush, parts just ordered from the west coast. An hour later he pulls up to his driveway as I'm walking by with the dog, gets out and gives me the box.

This is the same guy who, last spring, after I buggered up my first attempt at replacing Bridget's blown head gaskets, offered to deck the whole engine when I told him my regular machine shop said they couldn't do it without me taking the whole thing down to bare block. 

He backed his truck up my driveway the next morning, helped me load the Suby on the tail gate, and came back the next afternoon to unload it. 

I honestly hope like hell I can do him a favor some day. 

Gift cards in the mail are always good.

Trailered the Speedster to the coast last year. The AirBnB we like to stay at is in the middle of a 100 acre working vineyard for a winery named Castoro Cellars. Plenty of room to park my truck and trailer while we drive all over in the Speedster. On our last day while headed back to the AirBnB I ran out of gas, I know, rookie mistake. Anyway, called the lady that manages the property and asked if her husband was still on the ranch property and if he could bring me a gallon of fuel. She said he was in town but would call him. He showed up about twenty minutes later with several gallons of fuel. I thanked him profusely and we went back to the property, loaded up, and headed home. I made sure I sent her a gift card via the mail to thank her for the roadside service.

A revisionist hit, by Ed (sung to the Everly Brother’s Dream)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbU3zdAgiX8

Ream, ream, ream, ream
Ream, ream, ream, ream
When I want to, fix my car
When I want to, drive it far
Whenever I want to, all I have to do is
Ream, ream, ream, ream

When I feel blue, in the night
And I wake up, in a fright
Thinking of that damn car
All I have to do is ream

I can make it work, but I’m feeling like a jerk
Anytime night or day
Only trouble is, gee whiz
I'm reamin' my life away

My car is blue, and I am too,
I borrowed a tool, feel like a fool,
I know what must do, find a way to
Ream, ream, ream, ream, ream

I’ve never been so down, feeling like a clown
Anytime night or day
Only trouble is, gee whiz
I'm reamin' my life away

I’m so damned pissed, that I could die
I want to drive my car, and that is why
Whenever I need to, all I have to do is
Ream, ream, ream, ream
Ream, ream, ream, ream

Fade away with steady stream of tears….

Update (tech question): 

Torsion leaves, to my knowledge and by my experience, are supposed to slide out pretty easy once the center grub screw is loosened or removed.

Mine don't budge.

Took the grubs out of the adjusters. (Double-checked to make sure I had the right set of screws—the fixing grubs and not the adjusters). Tapped the upper (4-pack) with the rubber mallet. Tapped the lower (10-pack). Both slid about an inch and then stopped. 

Moved on to a block of wood and a bigger hammer. Then just the hammer. No joy. They'd slide a little one way then the other. Tried pulling with a vicegrip. I shook them, rattled them. Tapped them laterally with some vigor. Got a couple cold chisels and selected just one leaf at a time for attention.

Nothing worked. 

Examined matters more carefully and found I was sliding the whole center housing back and forth, so I oiled the holes and returned the grub screws in a couple three threads, not enough to make contact with the leaves. 

Now the spring packs slide about a quarter inch each way, max. IMG_5783

Got the larger hammer. Whaled on 'em some, both individually and en blanc. Nope.

IMG_5784

What am I missing? I did this job on Bridget most of a decade ago, and had another guy's beam completely apart and back together in a few hours on Saturday circa 2015.

Any advice appreciated. 

Knowledgeable advice moreso.

 

Attachments

Images (2)
  • IMG_5783
  • IMG_5784

Add Reply

Post Content
×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×
×