Sacto Mitch posted:

 Looking at this, it maybe confirms that the Speedster and pre-A coupe were the sweet spot in Porsche design - between too ‘swoopy’ and too angular.

You are very kind, Mitch.

I’ll say it: aside from the historical significance of this car, everything about it is hideous to my eye. 

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Stan Galat posted:
Sacto Mitch posted:

 Looking at this, it maybe confirms that the Speedster and pre-A coupe were the sweet spot in Porsche design - between too ‘swoopy’ and too angular.

You are very kind, Mitch.

I’ll say it: aside from the historical significance of this car, everything about it is hideous to my eye. 

Too harsh. It obviously influenced the beautiful car in Woody Allen's movie Sleeper!

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Stan Galat posted:
Sacto Mitch posted:

 Looking at this, it maybe confirms that the Speedster and pre-A coupe were the sweet spot in Porsche design - between too ‘swoopy’ and too angular.

You are very kind, Mitch.

I’ll say it: aside from the historical significance of this car, everything about it is hideous to my eye. 

Do the term "Butt Ugly" come to mind?!

 


From the beginning, Porsche's shapes were 80 per cent engineering and 20 per cent styling. This looks like it does because it came from an engineer and not a styling division.

The later shapes are probably easier on the eyes more because the engineering led them in that direction than for any other reason. The cabin on the Type 34 would have to be wider because the early design was just too cramped.

And who knew you'd end up with the prettiest convertible ever if you cut the windshield off a cab and threw away the windows and bulky top to save some bucks?

Lucky us.

 

 

Lane Anderson posted:

"The cabin on the Type 34 would have to be wider because the early design was just too cramped."

The seats in the replica were staggered, and I have to think the real one was the same.

Yes. The driver's seat was moved forward, as the battery was right behind it.  That caused quite a weird driving position, where the driver's leg were shifted right.  There is a Chris Harris video on YouTube of a test drive in the car.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaDWPBco07w

I got to breathe on this car today. It’s not often you can have the chance to witness the product that essentially started things we commonly know today. 

I was overwhelmed with a sense of awe. Similar to what I felt standing in the great Cathedrals in Italy. The Type 64 is raw. It’s unapologetic. It’s strikingly beautiful and yet ugly at the same time. And I loved it. 

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@Kevin - Bay Area wrote- "The Type 64 is raw. It’s unapologetic. It’s strikingly beautiful and yet ugly at the same time. And I loved it."

When you look at car design from that time- lots of swoopy, big flowing curves (the 1930's and into '40's really was the art deco period of car design) it's easy to see, in a time of great experimentation, the influences and where the Type 64 comes from. Dr. Porsche was a 'push the envelope' kind of guy!

Quite often I agree with the (somewhat) more staid, and even curmudgeonly opinions expressed here but I've always loved this car because it was 'so (almost too) out there'.

What Kevin said x 3- you hit the nail on the head, dude!

Sacto Mitch posted:

 

So it's really a Volkswagen with a Porsche badge.

Maybe Sotheby's is selling it because the ad got pulled from eBay.

Ok, Mitch, that was the laugh of the day!

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