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I converted my speedster to electric last winter, and I'm selling the old engine, exhaust, Raby upright cooling kit, 15 gallon gas tank, dual Weber carbs.  Basically everything except the transmission.  There is about 4,000 miles on the engine.  Compression is a little low in one of the cylinders and it's burning oil, so probably a cracked ring in that cylinder.  Full details on my speedster build can be found here: http://chriskate.net/speedster/ with LOTS and LOTS of pictures.

The picture from when I was building things.  It's a little more dirty now, but everything is there.  The engine is a Type IV, 2056.

Looking for $2,000 for everything plus shipping.

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Original Post
Chris Sutton posted:

I converted my speedster to electric last winter, and I'm selling the old engine, exhaust, Raby upright cooling kit, 15 gallon gas tank, dual Weber carbs.  Basically everything except the transmission.  There is about 4,000 miles on the engine.  Compression is a little low in one of the cylinders and it's burning oil, so probably a cracked ring in that cylinder.  Full details on my speedster build can be found here: http://chriskate.net/speedster/ with LOTS and LOTS of pictures.

The picture from when I was building things.  It's a little more dirty now, but everything is there.  The engine is a Type IV, 2056.

Looking for $2,000 for everything plus shipping.

Who did the electric conversion?

Do you have any pictures?

Click on the link he provided.  Very interesting and detailed build thread.  Well done!  Glad you didn't believe that 40 hour CMC build schedule.  You need a photo of your daughter driving it now!  I have photos of my son in a car seat watching me dismantle the donor car and clean the pan. (Argh, he'll be 30 in June this year).

Wish engine was closer to NW FL - exhaust $700, Raby T4 conversion kit $800, Carbs $600 - so $2k good deal.

Last edited by WOLFGANG

Another note for anyone interested in this engine.  There is no flywheel included.  I needed this for the EV conversion.  Also, there have been a number of questions on the specific internal details on the heads, cam, etc, etc.  I'm sorry, but I did all this and was really into the specs on things way back 15+ years ago, but I don't remember all the details and I didn't write them down anywhere.  Jake did a bunch of stuff, but I honestly don't remember all the details.

I am waiting for the engine to arrive. My engine guy will be finished with the 2110 (now 2276) out of the Puma next week. It has brand new CB 44 IDF carbs, Mahle thick wall 94's with total seal rings, Engle 120 cam. full flowed case fully balanced rotating assembly. 9.5:1 CR. 044 ultra mag heads with 44/37.5 valves . He is telling me it will be a screamer 1500-6500 rpm 180Hp engine. Brand new A-1 sidewinder 1 5/8" exhaust. I hope I will have pics to post of the rebuilding process and the cam run in soon.  Not sure how I am going to proceed with Chris's Type IV. Thinking of maybe going a little bigger displacement on this, how about a 2.5L Type IV. If anyone has interest in ether engine the prices will be more reasonable than you would think. You can have some choices on the type IV build if you wish.

I think you are wrong. changing the length of the connecting rods only will not give you larger displacement. You need to go larger P&C's and or a crank with a longer stroke. I just don't know what the normal approach to get to 2270 is. Possibly going to 103 or 104 P&C's may be easier and cheaper than a stroker crank. I had a big Type IV in a Porsche with something just shy of 2.5L displacement and it was extremely fast and bullet proof. I can't remember the bore and stroke of the engine. Some guy in NJ that used to frequent a 914 forum built these big Type IV engines. He owned a shop that specialized in Bentley's. This was back in the late 1990's.  I would love to find this guy ,if he sounds familiar to anyone let me know. All of my old emails are long gone.

Jim's 914

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78 mm stroke x 96  mm piston= 2258 cc's

As Jimmy and Rick mentioned, changing connecting rod length doesn't change displacement, but it does affect the torque curve, although a lot of experienced engine builders feel .100-.200" either way (remember we're talking about 5 ¼- 5½" center to center lengths) doesn't do enough to really make much difference in a street engine.

THAT said- Type 4 engines are known to be quite torquey (in comparison to Type 1's) and they do use a somewhat shorter (131 mm I believe) vs 137 mm Type 1 rod (with a 69 mm crankshaft and 1300/1500/1600 cc displacement depending on piston size). I'm of the understanding VW's watercooled engines use appreciably shorter rods as well- I believe older Rabbit engines paired 80 mm cranks with 135 mm rods and Porsche used 135 mm rods with 74 mm cranks for all their later 356 and 912 engines. A popular combo in the very late '60's/early '70's was 82 mm cranks ground with Porsche spec rod journals and 356 or 912 rods in Type 1 high performance engines- you had to be careful which rods you used, though, as the earlier (less beefy) 356 rods had a habit of breaking with the longer stroke cranks at higher rpm's and making a real mess!

Last edited by ALB

I thought the length of the rod dictates the location of where the piston will travel. I don't think it dictates the amount of torque or HP an engine will have. Example, if i build a type1 engine and use a 82mm crank and use the stock length rods the piston travel will start further out in the cylinder and travel out the end of the cylinder or crash into the head if it is installed. When stroking an engine the longer you go on the stroke this increased piston travel must be compensated by shorter rods and or shorter pistons. That is why you buy Piston and cylinder kits made to the crank  size you are using. The position and length of the cylinder doesn't change so when a crank that increases the length of the up and down piston travel is used things must be changed to compensate, this is accomplished by using short rods and short pistons. At the end of the day the travel of the piston must arrive at or near the top of the cylinder but not past the top of the cylinder. The piston can't travel too far down into the block either. Cylinder base shims are used to fine tune the piston top dead center to set the compression ratio. The other issue on rod length, as the cranks get into the larger stroke lengths (84-86mm) by having a rod that is too long takes the rotational angles into unfavorable territory and it develops high side pressure on the pistons and piston and crank bind. There are rod length and piston height formulas that work the best already figured out by engines builders that came before us, they have made the mistakes so we don't have too. If you call CB and tell them what size engine you want to build they will give you the correct rods and pistons for the crank you choose. 

 Yes there are those that have made longer than suggested rods work by using big spacers under the cylinder bases to move the cylinders further away from the crank. This is where you get into having the width of the engine increase and the stock cylinder tin has large gaps on each side where the tin should meet the fan shroud. This condition can't be kept from happening to some extent on the super long stroked engines. They sell filler blocks to fix this issue and keep the cooling air from escaping and causing an overheating issue. The need for longer head studs may occur as well. I have built a few engines and have learned this stuff as I went.

Last edited by Jimmy V.

I received the Type IV engine today.  Chris must have driven on unpaved roads for most of his 4000 miles. Seeing how dirty the engine is makes my decision to have the engine completely rebuilt. In my experience driving in exclusively dusty environments make it all but impossible to keep the dirt from getting inside the crank case, heads and cylinders not to mention the sensitive Weber carbs. I spoke to my engine guy. I will drop the type IV off to him a week from now when I pick up the 2276 Type 1 he is in the process of finishing. 

 Thanks Chris for packing the engine so nicely and boxing up all the loose parts. 

type 4 rebuild 1type 4 rebuildType 4 engine 4

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I spent 6 hours today degreasing and cleaning the Raby Type 4 engine that I bought from Chris Sutton on this listing. I have never seen a dirtier engine. The engine and carbs were completely coated in dirt and oil, up to and over 1/16" in many areas. To clean the engine I first sealed all openings that would allow water and degreasing foam to enter inside the engine. I lifted the engine up on a fork lift and covered it with degreasing foam and let it sit the 15 minutes the instructions recommend. This loosened the sludge some. I then used an electric powered high pressure sprayer to attack the grime. It took 3 applications of degreaser and high pressure sprayer to blow away 95% or the dirt and grease. I then used a gun cleaning wire bore cleaner to scrub the hard to reach areas. I then did the same to the carbs. It may be hard to see from the pics but this engine was the dirtiest I have ever seen. It looked like it was in a flood and then buried for a length of time. I won't be surprised when I discover some level of dirt and sludge inside the engine. The carbs were filthy even inside the area under the air cleaners, so dirt was getting past the air filters.  I may have said this before but the Speedster must have been driven almost exclusively on dirt roads or flat out used for off road excursions. I feel better now that the engine is cleaner and ready to be rebuilt.  The 2276 Type 1 engine being built will be finished this week. I will install it in the Puma and she how it runs. It should really scream. I will keep you posted.

 The first pic below is an example of how dirty the engine was.

 PS. I  uncovered this stamped into the top front of the engine case "RAT2003032" I assume it means this was the 32nd engine Jake Raby had a hand in during 2003. I also uncovered interesting numbers stamped on each head, the right side head has 32.6 / 34. The left head has 32.2 / 34. Each number has the universal sign for diameter which is a circle with a leaning line thru it. If it is valve sizes why would one head have a valve that is .4 mm's smaller than the other, and the sizes would be way too small for valves. I am stumped on this. Looking into the intake ports it is easy to see that some nice porting work has been done which makes sense since Jake Raby built the heads. Anyone with info. concerning this (Chris Sutton maybe? ) It would be appreciated. All in all I think I got an amazing deal on this 2056 Type IV RAT engine.

Type 4 engine 4Type 4 engine after degreasing2Type 4 engine after degreasing3Type 4 engine after degreasing4Type 4 engine after degreasing5type 4 rebuild 3

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I agree, this engine has ingested tons of dirt and needs a full rebuild which I am planning on doing. I wanted to get it in a cleaner condition before I take it to my engine guy in a week or so. I will pick up the Puma 2110 turned into a 2276 Type 1 engine and drop this baby off. It will save me some money to have the engine degreased. My guy charges by the hour not a flat fee. So far the engines he has rebuilt for me come out super reasonably priced. 

 The seller had in his listing that the engine had 4000 miles on it but had low compression in number 2 cylinder and was smoking a bit. He thought it was a broken ring? I now know that is unlikely. The engine is probably worn from the dirt that has been sucked into it. My original plan was to re jug and piston it and have the heads rebuilt and not crack the case open. That plan has changed. The last three engines I have had rebuilt all have flattened cams among other issues. Seems to be an epidemic. I know why Chris went to EV power now. Driving in such dusty conditions is hard on internal combustion engines unless you run a good oil bath air cleaner and keep the oil in it changed regularly.

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