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Stick with it. You'll get it sorted.

One thing that fails on these cars all the time is grounds. Often, if you find your ground straps, remove, sand them and bolt them back in with a star washer all your lights and accessories will magically start working even despite the wiring looking like an osprey's nest.

Then you add a few more grounds (tail lights, etc.) and can rave on.

@edsnova posted:

Stick with it. You'll get it sorted.

One thing that fails on these cars all the time is grounds. Often, if you find your ground straps, remove, sand them and bolt them back in with a star washer all your lights and accessories will magically start working even despite the wiring looking like an osprey's nest.

Then you add a few more grounds (tail lights, etc.) and can rave on.

^^^ What Ed said ^^^

And if you are feeling a bit of future prevention coming on, wipe the connections with dielectric grease before you tighten them. If you are planning a conversion to EFI, grounding becomes even more important because the engine sensors usually reference their signals to ground. In the best case, you end up having all of your engine, dash and power grounds coming in to one point on the engine (star configuration).

Your ECU/EFI signal grounds all get routed separately back to one connection to the ECU. Cable shielding grounds also connect to this ECU signal ground but are left open on the sensor end.  It's not complicated when you get the principles, but you end up pulling a lot of ground wires.

Good luck!

This looks like a great adventure. If you're going for a big engine my opinion is that the optimal displacement size is a 2007 (90.5 mm bore with 78 mm stroke). That combo keeps the most meat on the block for reliability, both on the bores and less clearancing inside for the stroker crank. Something tells me you will be a lifer on this like many of us here are. Congratulations, good luck and we'll be following your build.

We added a modern fuse box today. The headlights now work and I’ve got power to the tach. The RPM’s don’t work and I don’t have front turn signals yet.  I’ve got the red lights in the VDO gauge and the turn green arrow signal operating in the RPM gauge but the needle is dead. I’m assuming it runs back to the coil but I haven’t chased any wires yet.

In the headlight bowls there are small bulbs coming from the bottom. I also have orange beehives underneath. Are the beehives running lights and the bulbs the turn signals? I think the bulbs are clear…

DA32431B-EA54-47D5-B64D-C61003A77577

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Last edited by GreasySideUp

The disc brakes came in today. I’ve got carb rebuild kits, electronic ignition, coil, and shift bushings on the way. I got the front seatbelts installed, I want to install one for the rear as well for the rare time my daughter will be back there.

I’ll do a search but had anyone reading this found a good way to mount a shoulder harness?   Brand, size and location would be great.

I’ll do a search but had anyone reading this found a good way to mount a shoulder harness?   Brand, size and location would be great.

You're making great progress! Here's what I did for shoulder harnesses. The key goal is to get the harness support at shoulder height so the belt doesn't damage your neck/shoulder in an accident.

I bought belt assemblies from Greg at Vintage Motorcars and welded up supports that extended from the wheel well area into the space behind the top of the package tray (a small rectangular hole was cut in the top of the wheel well fiberglass).

Welded to the top of the bracket is a flat rectangle of steel curved to follow the shape of the fiberglass at shoulder height at the top of the package tray area. The belt support is attached through the fiberglass and into the curved rectangle.

The belt reels are attached on the front of the package tray behind the seats.

Pictures and more details here:

https://www.speedsterowners.co...4#590585064152345514

The specs sound great, 9.1:1 is a tiny bit low on the compression, but that sounds like a great motor especially at that price. There are a lot of good parts in there.

It's definitely a street motor. It appears to be full-flowed. I wouldn't use those crimped hoses for oil, I'd use AN8 instead. I'd have an external filter, an oil thermostat and external cooler. And those stainless steel breather lines look small. You want at least 1/2" ID.

I don't personally get the magneto, no need for that on the street.

If the deck height is 0.040", the compression should be 9.6:1. I'd re-shim the cylinders to give 0.040" deck. I just built a 2276 with 9.6:1 and 58cc chambers, deck height is 0.045".

Last edited by DannyP
@DannyP posted:

The specs sound great, 9.1:1 is a tiny bit low on the compression, but that sounds like a great motor especially at that price. There are a lot of good parts in there.

It's definitely a street motor. It appears to be full-flowed. I wouldn't use those crimped hoses for oil, I'd use AN8 instead. I'd have an external filter, an oil thermostat and external cooler. And those stainless steel breather lines look small. You want at least 1/2" ID.

I don't personally get the magneto, no need for that on the street.

If the deck height is 0.040", the compression should be 9.6:1. I'd re-shim the cylinders to give 0.040" deck. I just built a 2276 with 9.6:1 and 58cc chambers, deck height is 0.045".

It’s a stock magnesium case bored out. Is that going to last with that hp?  What kind of numbers would this thing make?

I'd say a minimum 150 hp, without knowing heads(I don't feel like looking them up). It's probably more like 160-180.

Lose the magneto and the tall stacks. Put shorter stacks and real air filters on it.

I have a 2165cc, AS41 mag case with 78 crank and 94mm barrels. It produces 180hp. I did a top-end rebuild at 45,000 miles. Oil pressure is great and bottom end is good.

The most important thing is that the bottom end is BALANCED to prevent wear. Also, minimize time above 6000rpm. I'd bet the crank is counter-weighted so that lessens wear also.

Last edited by DannyP
@DannyP posted:

I'd say a minimum 150 hp, without knowing heads(I don't feel like looking them up). It's probably more like 160-180.

Lose the magneto and the tall stacks. Put shorter stacks and real air filters on it.

I have a 2165cc, AS41 mag case with 78 crank and 94mm barrels. It produces 180hp. I did a top-end rebuild at 45,000 miles. Oil pressure is great and bottom end is good.

The most important thing is that the bottom end is BALANCED to prevent wear. Also, minimize time above 6000rpm. I'd bet the crank is counter-weighted so that lessens wear also.

Thanks Danny.

With that much hp do I need to worry about tearing everything else apart?  Can the current drive train handle it?

I would ask around before you trash-can that Vertex Magneto.  Those things were state-of-the-art before the Bosch 009 came along and were really well made.  They also put out a helluva lot of voltage, like 60,000+ volts!  I say check the shaft for side play and if it's tight, run it.  I ran a Kong magneto on my '46 flathead V8 and it was one potent ignition system.  Vertex had about the same reputation, but ask on the Samba what people think of them before you decide.

I would ask around before you trash-can that Vertex Magneto.  Those things were state-of-the-art before the Bosch 009 came along and were really well made.  They also put out a helluva lot of voltage, like 60,000+ volts!  I say check the shaft for side play and if it's tight, run it.  I ran a Kong magneto on my '46 flathead V8 and it was one potent ignition system.  Vertex had about the same reputation, but ask on the Samba what people think of them before you decide.

I didn't say to throw it in the trash. Who else runs one on the street? Name one guy.

Greasy isn't running a drag race as far as I know. A stock or built transmission has NOTHING done to first and second. Third and fourth yes, plus other internal mods. But first and second are usually bone-stock. It's the 4.12 ring and pinion(torque multiplication) and sticky tires that breaks stuff with hard launches. With a 3.88 or 3.44 final, they can take some abuse.

Last edited by DannyP

So my debate is this.

The bottom end came from an unknown shop around Abilene and the top end was finished and tuned locally. That was 2 years ago and then the project never materialized. I can’t verify the reputation of the original builder. The tuner/top end has a great reputation. It will be right around 4K plus a muffler.

It looks like a similar 2110/2275 will be around 5500-6k with an aluminum block, without carbs or muffler from a great local builder. It’s about a 3k risk for a bit of an unknown vs a local shop with a warranty and some support. I’m torn. If that motor works great, I’d obviously love to save the money….. If it is junk, I’d be out the 4K plus a new 5500$ motor…..

I’m going to sleep on it.

She got new plugs and wires this afternoon. There were moments on the test drive of pure glory. She cleaned up and had a ton of power for a second or two here and there…. It was glorious.  Mostly though she was a wet dog completely bogged down.

I think I’m at a stop without rebuilding the carbs. I’ve got an electronic ignition on the way as well if the carbs don’t clean her up.

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...She got new plugs and wires this afternoon. There were moments on the test drive of pure glory. She cleaned up and had a ton of power for a second or two here and there…. It was glorious....

...I think I’m at a stop without rebuilding the carbs. I’ve got an electronic ignition on the way as well if the carbs don’t clean her up...



A few random thoughts.

Totally mucked up carbs generally will not produce a ton of power for a second or two. But inconsistent spark will.

If you've already got a new dizzy on the way, I think I'd wait to swap that out before doing anything with the carbs. You can learn more futzing with one variable at a time than by changing everything at once. And a new dizzy will be easier futzing than rebuilding carbs.

You probably WILL need to rebuild the carbs (and should do so anyway, just on general principle), but let there be some method to the madness.

Just what you needed, right? More free advice.

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Last edited by Sacto Mitch
@Sacto Mitch posted:

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A few random thoughts.

Totally mucked up carbs generally will not produce a ton of power for a second or two. But inconsistent spark will.

If you've already got a new dizzy on the way, I think I'd wait to swap that out before doing anything with the carbs. You can learn more futzing with one variable at a time than by changing everything at once. And a new dizzy will be easier futzing than rebuilding carbs.

You probably WILL need to rebuild the carbs (and should do so anyway, just on general principle), but let there be some method to the madness.

Just what you needed, right? More free advice.

.

To play devil’s advocate for a minute. The guys at F.A.S.T. told me to get my car running PERFECTLY before I installed my electronic ignition. Thinking that if that was done, any “issues” that cropped up could be  directly blamed in the ignition, I guess. .

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If a motor is running pretty well and you're upgrading one component, it makes sense to check out everything else before making the change.

But if a motor is barely running and everything is suspect, it's easier to dial in the electrics first. Most of that can be dialed in pretty well even if the engine is still running poorly.

The religious texts on carb tuning state clearly in their preambles (the part before they start ambling) that thou shalt setteth the spark and see the spark that it is good.

I should caution you, though, that everything I know about religion I got from YouTube videos.

.

I was told not to launch mine till I got a modified  transmission first gear would shear off if I didn’t. What they told me was to get a hardened 1st gear. It might be because my tires are 10 inches wide too..soo I have never launched it hard just to be on the SAFE side!  You my be Right @DannyP I’m by no means a expert on transmissions or really anything else that’s why I Rely on you guys

If you have an early (3.80) 1st gear mainshaft and 10" tires I'd be careful too. The later 3.78(1973 and up) gears are much stronger, as are most of the custom Weddle mainshafts and idler gears. In case you didn't know, first and second are a permanent part of the mainshaft, and must be chosen together.

@Arden Do you know your exact gearing and rear tire diameter? I'd like to know what you have.

It's funny, I just received a book today from US Book Depot(owned by Amazon).

Tim Marshall(Casting Timmy from thesamba.com): T1 IRS Rebuild Manual. $60 for a paperback, but there is a lot of specific info that someone like me who builds a few transmissions can use. The best thing? It's all in one place.

He's certainly a smart guy. He's also helpful, he sent me a couple destroyed gears so I could make my own tools. Thanks, Tim.

You need the numbers from whoever built it.

Unless it's stock and not rebuilt. Then you'd need the two letter code on the passenger side lower portion of the gear carrier(not the case or the nosecone). Something like AH, AT, DC etc. There are charts online what is in there.

https://www.thesamba.com/vw/fo...do++have&start=0

Honestly though, these things are around 50 years old or so. There is NO way you can know what's in there unless you have an invoice from a transmission shop OR you bought it new BITD.

Last edited by DannyP

Now you got in deep territory. Transaxles, ratios, etc are the main areas of expertise for a few members here. They have it all down to a science. In my personal case I have a basic freeway flyer and there’s a marked spread between 3rd and 4th. The good thing about the freeway flyers is that they give you the choice to use your car on the freeway at less extreme rpms depending on the ratios and combos. They are still high on some; in my case my car does 60 mph at 3,000 rpms and that’s with stock 165 SR 15 tires.

If you want to launch a type 1 trans, you need either a later 3.78 main shaft, or better yet a Weddle main shaft.  Along with this a 4 spider differential.

Freeway flyer is just a made up name for a transmission that has a taller 4th gear.  Transform, long out of business, made up that name back in the 1980’s to up sell people a .82 4th gear.  

Keep in mind, the lower the ring and pinion number, for ex, 3.88, the stronger the gear, for a given type of tooth design.  Type 1 r&p have been available in 3.44, 3.88, 4.12, 4.37, and 4.86 over the years. 3.44 and 4.86 are aftermarket only, whereas the others have been available in both factory and aftermarket.

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