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@Carlos P posted:

All I know it is a 2332cc aircooled engine with 145hp

@WOLFGANG posted:

84 mm stroker cam and 94 mm pistons and cylinders.  Good size engine and 145 hp is probably right.

As @edsnova said, it's a type 1 engine.  With the dual Kadrons (with bigger venturis), I'm guessing a camshaft/rocker combo that goes to 5,000 (or a touch more) rpm with power and lifts the valves to over .450", Los Panchitos cnc'd heads, 8½:1 cr and 1½" exhaust.  It'd be a stump puller from about 1500 rpm and up.  I think the Kadrons would be just about at their limit, and I'd also guess that even with the longer 3.88 r&p it would be surprisingly quick off the line...  Al

T4's used in US 914's and 411/412 were fuel injected so electric pump.  Early T2 Bus  ('72 up to about '75?) were dual Solex carbs so manual fuel pump.  All T4 has place for the spin on oild filter near the horizontal larger than T1 air filter.  Oil filler and dip stick are different on T4 than on T1 but varied even on T4 applications.  A flat OEM T4 can fit in a speedster and I suspect a Spyder.  I think in flat form it is easier to work on than with upright cooling.  Upright conversion generally means loosing the thermostat too.  Heat exchanges - and the mounting to the engine is very different - being on the bottom vs at either end.  Near all T4 have an aluminum cases (a very few are early ones were magnesium) -- all OEM T1 were magnesium (but aftermarket one are aluminum now). On t4 you can remove/replace pushrod tubes with heads on - on T1 you need to remove heads (or use adjustable tubes).

T4:

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  • mceclip0
Last edited by WOLFGANG

@dlearl476 asked “I was asking how you tell the difference from the above photo.”

Well, basically, you can’t.

If you can look up under the back end of the car, you can look for the spin-on oil filter, but the BIG give-away is that the T1 exhaust exits horizontally, while a T4 exits vertically, down.  (But you could never discern that from the photo).  

This was kind-of an issue when I got my Massachusetts replica registration, because the engine supposedly has to be what was in a ‘57 Porsche Speedster, a 1,600cc.  Unless you tear down and measure the engine internals, how you evah gonnah know what it is from the outside??

@DannyP posted:

It is hard to tell with an upright conversion, Dave. But yeah, the fuel pump block-off is a dead giveaway in an upright conversion.

@dlearl476 This is the answer you're looking for, even though Gordon and Greg are doubtful. Just ignore, you CAN tell from the OP picture.

The type1 fuel pump mounted on top of the case between the distributor and the alternator right by the pulley. This we all know and have seen a zillion times with either a pump or block-off plate.

The type4 fuel pump was on the pulley end of the engine case but over by the number 4 cylinder, on the OTHER side of the distributor.

type4 pump

You are looking up, as type4 exhaust exits the bottom of the head. You can just see the #4 pushrod tube at the bottom of the picture.

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  • type4 pump
Last edited by DannyP

This was kind-of an issue when I got my Massachusetts replica registration, because the engine supposedly has to be what was in a ‘57 Porsche Speedster, a 1,600cc.  Unless you tear down and measure the engine internals, how you evah gonnah know what it is from the outside??

Yeah, Gordon, I have the same issue. The CA registration plate lists “1600cc” but the PO told me it has a “CB Perf 2.0L”. I haven’t waded into it past the rockers (which definitely are aftermarket) so I have no way of knowing. I tried to contact CB but they don’t keep records, or at least they didn’t.

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