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Do I need to put gasket sealer on the gaskets on the oil drain ring?  I’m taking out the 5 or 6 nuts that hold the round ring that the oil change plug screws into. I’m getting a slight leak from that ring is why I’m changing the gaskets on it. I’m also using a new washer on the plug. I’m using Valvoline 20-50 racing oil again. Is 4 quarts enough, it’s been a year and I forgot to record the amount of oil I used last time.

Thanks guys,

Ron

AKA Popee

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I would use a little gasket sealer on the paper gaskets- in the cheaper oil change kits they're not treated and oil will can seep through them. If your Speedster's engine is a stock VW Type 1- 2½ quarts (aprox- buy 3 and there will be a little left over); with full flow filter- extra ½-1 quart; with deep sump- extra 2-3 quarts.

I've always filled the filter on cars that allow, i.e. the filter screws straight UP onto the flange. I have no data, but I believe it's a good thing to do. It won't hurt, that's for sure.

When it's angled some or 90 degrees from "normal" you can't.

But as you say, disconnect the coil and turn it over until the light goes out or the gauge reads pressure, Robert. Good advice. I especially do this on cars with complicated oil systems(which means us with full flow or dry sump setups).

On the daily driver I just turn the key and let it idle and watch for the light to go out in about 3 seconds. Once the light goes out, I look underneath to make sure there are no leaks.

Last edited by DannyP
@DannyP posted:

I've always filled the filter on cars that allow, i.e. the filter screws straight UP onto the flange. I have no data, but I believe it's a good thing to do. It won't hurt, that's for sure.

When it's angled some or 90 degrees from "normal" you can't.

But as you say, disconnect the coil and turn it over until the light goes out or the gauge reads pressure, Robert. Good advice. I especially do this on cars with complicated oil systems(which means us with full flow or dry sump setups).

On the daily driver I just turn the key and let it idle and watch for the light to go out in about 3 seconds. Once the light goes out, I look underneath to make sure there are no leaks.

I also prefill my filters, if I can. Some filters have a rubber one way flap that prevents the oil from draining out of the filter. If your filter has one of these, it can be filled and installed at an angle with minimal mess.

My 4-runner has the worst filter location and orientation ever. I had to make a "gutter" of sorts that gets shoved under the filter to catch and redirect the oil when I remove it.

Modern Subaru's have a feature that's pretty cool. When you floor the gas pedal and then start it, it won't start, but you can turn the motor over until the oil light goes out.

Last edited by Carlos G

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@Popee , there is a better way, once you get all those little nuts and washers properly sealed up.

All of that business is there so that you can remove and clean the strainer thing that VW's had instead of a proper oil filter.

But, you've got a proper oil filter, so the strainer thing shouldn't have much to strain and really doesn't need to be removed and cleaned at all (or at least not at every oil change).

You can drill and tap that plate to accept a small, easily removable drain plug, just like real cars have. Here's the mod done to the cast aluminum plate on my CB thinline sump:

DrainPlug

If you don't want to take this on yourself, any machinist could do it in a few minutes. Maybe get an extra plate and have the plug installed on that, then swap in the new plate the next time you change oil.

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Last edited by Sacto Mitch

All good stuff up above. I also pre-fill my external oil filter and have some data to go along with that:  

When I don’t pre-fill the oil filter and then crank the engine over with no spark to get oil pressure up, it takes 23-ish seconds before I get pressure and my oil light goes out.

If I pre-fill the oil filter and crank it over, the oil pressure light goes out in 11 seconds or so.

Also, @Popee, it is VERY important that you use new (not re-used) copper washers under the nuts holding the plate.  Why?  Because the copper washers are a little softer and crush slightly when torqued to the proper amount, sealing between the plate, the stud threads and the nut.

Thank you for the drain plug idea. Mine has that with a regular size drain plug. I’m removing it because I’m getting a tiny oil leak from the drain plug or the part that has the screen. It’s a tiny leak but anything that’s leaking really bothers me, I’m cursed cause I’m a Virgo. I’m also retired and always looking for something to do. Thought I would include a couple of pictures of the Speedster.

Popee

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I think it was said above about when removing the whole plate: use the red stuff (silicone gasket maker) on the new gaskets when you put the pieces back together.  Both sides. Has worked for me for many years.  And also have a few of those new copper gaskets available for the plug.  Without trying to get a whole 'nuther thread drift on how to keep your engine from dripping oil, I'm gonna say mine does not.  I will say that it seems to sweat it. I don't have drips on the floor, but there is oil under there.  I wipe it down with a rag every now and then.  So there is no VW/Porsche 4 banger ever made that does not have at least some oil that was initially put on the inside, but has managed to get to the outside.  Is what it is.

I am not a proponent of silicone or any other sealer on the oil sump, never have been. I find it unnecessary and a pain in the butt when you remove, clean, and re-assemble.

The "sainted VW engineers" never used any sealer, so, there's that.

There are aftermarket sump plates in both 6-bolt(stock) and 8-bolt(for aftermarket extended sump) flanges. They use O-rings to seal and don't leak, unless the leak is coming from the case seam(which has nothing to do with sump sealing).

These sump covers also have a nice, flush drain plug. Once you install this plate, you shouldn't have to remove it, especially if you have a remote filter setup.

Both JayCee(now owned by EMPI) and Ron Lummus Racing make these sump plates, possibly others as well.

https://www2.cip1.com/jc-2104-0/

Last edited by DannyP

Everybody has opinions about gasket sealers, probably stronger opinions than about motor oil. If you want to use sealer on gaskets, I use Curil T on pretty much everything (sump gaskets included) and really like it. I have no idea if I’m doing it as per intended use, but it never sets up and can be easily removed, which is very desirable to me.

Supposedly the formula has changed (why, nobody knows), but I have a 15 year old half-tube I keep using for everything.

Last edited by Stan Galat

We try not to use sealant on oil sump and valve cover gaskets as a default. That is the way they were intended.

If we get a stubborn one that will not seal up, even after inspection for scratches or imperfections, I'll use a small wipe of Gasgacinch, which solves the issue 9/10 times.

If we get one that is really really stubborn and Gasgacinch doesn't cut it, then I'll go to a thin swipe off a high temp RTV, but I HATE doing that and save it for a last resort.

@Popee posted:

Thank you for the drain plug idea. Mine has that with a regular size drain plug. I’m removing it because I’m getting a tiny oil leak from the drain plug or the part that has the screen. It’s a tiny leak but anything that’s leaking really bothers me, I’m cursed cause I’m a Virgo. I’m also retired and always looking for something to do. Thought I would include a couple of pictures of the Speedster.

Popee

Awesome pics, Ron!  I have a 54 Chevrolet pickup, and we've used it for years in this fashion.  ;-) 

$26  for ONE valve cover gasket??  Hmmm.  I've had very good luck with FEL-PRO, VS 26062 R, which seem to be a fiber reinforced neoprene (or other elastomer). A little shmear of the red stuff, left overnight to set up, and you're good to go for quite a while. This approach eliminates any possible slippage of the gasket when you go to put it in place. maybe not reuseable forever, but you can get several valve adjustments out of them.  There is a little bit of rubbing required to clean up a valve cover when you need to change out,  but its really no big deal.

On Amazon for about $5. They also have a kit for the strainer cover for about $5

FEL-PRO OS 21625 Oil Pan Gasket Set

Just FYI.

@El Frazoo posted:

$26  for ONE valve cover gasket??  Hmmm.  I've had very good luck with FEL-PRO, VS 26062 R, which seem to be a fiber reinforced neoprene (or other elastomer). A little shmear of the red stuff, left overnight to set up, and you're good to go for quite a while. This approach eliminates any possible slippage of the gasket when you go to put it in place. maybe not reuseable forever, but you can get several valve adjustments out of them.  There is a little bit of rubbing required to clean up a valve cover when you need to change out,  but its really no big deal.

On Amazon for about $5. They also have a kit for the strainer cover for about $5

FEL-PRO OS 21625 Oil Pan Gasket Set

Just FYI.

I concur on the gasket. I prefer contact cement instead of silicone. Coat the VC and the gasket, wait 10, put together. Grease the head side of the gasket, and go have a beer.

They last for YEARS this way. Cleanup with brake cleaner or Xylene.

@El Frazoo posted:

$26  for ONE valve cover gasket??  Hmmm.  I've had very good luck with FEL-PRO, VS 26062 R, which seem to be a fiber reinforced neoprene (or other elastomer). A little shmear of the red stuff, left overnight to set up, and you're good to go for quite a while. This approach eliminates any possible slippage of the gasket when you go to put it in place. maybe not reuseable forever, but you can get several valve adjustments out of them.  There is a little bit of rubbing required to clean up a valve cover when you need to change out,  but its really no big deal.

On Amazon for about $5. They also have a kit for the strainer cover for about $5

FEL-PRO OS 21625 Oil Pan Gasket Set

Just FYI.

I think you misread, it’s $26 for a pair.  

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