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@edsnova - He doesn't have the body, engine or transaxle installed yet, just a bare pan so there's no weight to hold the pan down as you jack the spring plate up.  With a complete car this issue goes away - Just jack the plate up.

I've always used the cup/bowl of a roll-around floor jack to lever under the spring plate and lift it up onto the perch of the torsion bar end cap because I felt safer with that, rather than the 1-1/2" Dia piston of a bottle jack which has a much smaller area and the plate might slip off and take your foot with it.

I like both Imperial and Alan's idea, though - Safety first!  Remember that the spring plate end moves in an arc so whatever is used to move it up has to be able to move slightly as it lifts.  Attaching a plate tool to the top shock mount bolt makes a whole lot of sense.

And since I have NEVER gotten the ride height set properly the first time (or the second, third or fourth) if you have a welder, it might be prudent to make up a tool to lift the spring plate.  They tend to run $50 - $75 bucks, which seems like a lot for a piece of threaded shaft, a couple of nuts and some flat stock welded up.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/28422...1EAQYBiABEgI95_D_BwE

Last edited by Gordon Nichols

We use a 4' pry bar with the end wrapped in leather (a towel would be fine) with the leather end on top of the 3" tube and the bar under the spring plate.  Pry up with one hand and tap in with the other.  Make sure your adjusters (if equipped) are adjusted all the way down.  If you are picking up the car then you are pre0loaded too much so try reclocking them to be a bit lighter.  With the aforementioned tools it is a one man job in our shop.

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