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Sacto Mitch posted:

 

One advantage of the $10 ignition switch that was standard equipment on my VS is that the designers have already minimized the mass of the key. No further lightening is required - or even prudent.

And the pot metal in the switch body is also the lightest alloy obtainable.

The key shape is correct for mailboxes and piggy banks of the period.

And in a master stroke, they extended this 'less is more' design philosophy to the switch contacts, too.

 

NePlusUltraSwitch01

 

 

@Sacto Mitch - funny!

The key and switch are actually cheap Bosch replacements ($40). The original switch was the same as those in the late pre-A/T1 A cars. I had one of those in my 1956 356A.

John Willhoit, a 356 restorer and friend of mine, actually drilled the key for me-turned out well! 

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Gordon Nichols posted:

Ed:  Anand’s also got one of those super-light “Al Blanchette Special” racing ignition keys, too!  

It’s becoming a long winter.   I may have to create my own lightened racing key for something more to do.

Careful, Gordon- once you start it'll keep you busy all winter...

arajani posted:
Sacto Mitch posted:

 

One advantage of the $10 ignition switch that was standard equipment on my VS is that the designers have already minimized the mass of the key. No further lightening is required - or even prudent.

And the pot metal in the switch body is also the lightest alloy obtainable.

The key shape is correct for mailboxes and piggy banks of the period.

And in a master stroke, they extended this 'less is more' design philosophy to the switch contacts, too.

 

NePlusUltraSwitch01

 

 

@Sacto Mitch - funny!

The key and switch are actually cheap Bosch replacements ($40). The original switch was the same as those in the late pre-A/T1 A cars. I had one of those in my 1956 356A.

John Willhoit, a 356 restorer and friend of mine, actually drilled the key for me-turned out well! 

AnandF091A8EB-CADA-45E4-AA3E-16B177521B29

Never a bad thing when one of your friends is one of the best in the business. 

Gordon Nichols posted:

It would be cool to cut a Celtic Knott into mine, but that gets complicated really fast.

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Ok, you do that and you're also a member of the Too Anal For Your Own Good club- I sooo want to see this!

And @Sacto Mitch wrote- "One advantage of the $10 ignition switch that was standard equipment on my VS is that the designers have already minimized the mass of the key. No further lightening is required - or even prudent."

You're looking at it all wrong, Mitch- there's room to drill 3 or 4 holes- just 'cause you can!

Last edited by ALB
Sacto Mitch posted:


Al, I think Gordon was just checking to see if you qualify for club membership.

Didn’t you spot the mistake in his Celtic knot?

 

I'm of French-Canadian and Russian heritage. I wouldn't know a Celtic knot if it slapped me in the face...

And that key Carlos posted a pic of- a work of art! (most of you guys have no idea how long that probably took)

Last edited by ALB
Bob: IM S6 posted:
Sacto Mitch posted:

Didn’t you spot the mistake in his Celtic knot?

I give up.  It's been three hours and I'm still looking...

Dr. Carely,

We regret to inform you that we cannot accept your application into the apprentice OCD shop-head program at this time.

While your application showed some impressive academic credentials, you unfortunately failed to pass the abstract pattern recognition test. This test is the threshold for admission into our guild, regardless of any tangential accomplishments. We consider it a great loss that someone with a mind so gifted and capable should be let down by the inability to find fault with any (and every) small flaw.   

Please be aware that there will be no second opportunity to re-take the test, as it establishes if a certain genetic mutation is present (or not) in our prospective candidates. We have many applicants and only a select number of slots.

You should also be advised that acceptance into our guild would also have included (as the price of acceptance) a vow of poverty, trouble in close relationships, and the inability to look at anything without finding some defect. We are bundles of joy at parties.

I'm sure you'll find success in whatever (other) endeavor you choose to pursue. I hope you'll find conciliation in knowing that you seem to be more generally suited to find happiness and love and to be more easily satisfied with people in general, given your (unfortunately) uncritical nature.

Good luck in your regrettably happy life.

Last edited by Stan Galat

You know, I didn't even look closely at that image that I stole off the web, but Danny and Mitch got it right - The circle is supposed to be intertwined better with the triangle as Mitch showed in the bottom image.  BOTH of them get the prestigious "OCD-Dude-of-the-Week" award.

Kathy and I have Celtic Knott wedding bands which have a variation on the theme and look like this (hers is far less beat-up looking):

IMG_0486

Always nice to have something to do in the depths of Winter when things are slow on the farm and everything that was broken is now fixed.

Fortunately, my VW-style key has a lot of territory available to sketch out the pattern and maybe fit it in to look classy - Like a Blank slate, huh Al?  Seems like a lot of cutting/filing rather than drilling for that pattern, though.   I Noticed that Lowe's has already lightened my house key.....    

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BTW:  this is my horn button (looks suspiciously like a Kilt Pin, but Whaddo I know?) with yet another variation on the theme, although this one is nicely done (and more Scottish than Irish, but they're all crazy buggers).

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Last edited by Gordon Nichols
Stan Galat posted:
Bob: IM S6 posted:
Sacto Mitch posted:

Didn’t you spot the mistake in his Celtic knot?

I give up.  It's been three hours and I'm still looking...

Dr. Carely,

We regret to inform you that we cannot accept your application into the apprentice OCD shop-head program at this time.

While your application showed some impressive academic credentials, you unfortunately failed to pass the abstract pattern recognition test. This test is the threshold for admission into our guild, regardless of any tangential accomplishments. We consider it a great loss that someone with a mind so gifted and capable should be let down by the inability to find fault with any (and every) small flaw.   

Please be aware that there will be no second opportunity to re-take the test, as it establishes if a certain genetic mutation is present (or not) in our prospective candidates. We have many applicants and only a select number of slots.

You should also be advised that acceptance into our guild would also have included (as the price of acceptance) a vow of poverty, trouble in close relationships, and the inability to look at anything without finding some defect. We are bundles of joy at parties.

I'm sure you'll find success in whatever (other) endeavor you choose to pursue. I hope you'll find conciliation in knowing that you seem to be more generally suited to find happiness and love and to be more easily satisfied with people in general, given your (unfortunately) uncritical nature.

Good luck in your regrettably happy life.

Well, for sh@t's sake.  First, I get rejected by the PCA, and now by this prestigious organization. 

How many rejections can one take in one's life?

I go back to bed for a couple of hours and this thread takes a smokin' left turn deep into the heart of Nutbarville- you guys rock!

And then @Gordon Nichols wrote- " Always nice to have something to do in the depths of Winter when things are slow on the farm and everything that was broken is now fixed.

Fortunately, my VW-style key has a lot of territory available to sketch out the pattern and maybe fit it in to look classy - Like a Blank slate, huh Al?  Seems like a lot of cutting/filing rather than drilling for that pattern, though.   I Noticed that Lowe's has already lightened my house key.....    "

I'm expecting big things from you at Carlisle, Gordon- better get to work on that key now! ('cause you're gonna be in the garage a long, long time)  And btw- showing off that store bought house key doesn't count unless you do some additional re-working...

And @Sacto Mitch- I forgot to mention it earlier, but the research you put in when shopping for the new ignition switch- A+! The key leaves a little to be desired, though- I expect you'll get on that right away...

 

Last edited by ALB

Carey and Brad are grinding away -- they are getting the interior knocked out! 

Carey had mentioned wanting to make these little door seals that run along the front of the door (@edsnova has recreated them exceptionally well, too). Real spyders didn't have any door seals, so these little pieces of fabric were meant to minimize wind noise through the gaps. The car pictured below isn't mine -- it is an original car with an Acella bast interior. 

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At present, Carey is knocking out the metal ferrules to guide the barber pole vinyl (he did half of them over the weekend -- the guy works HARD!). He truly is in a class of his own.

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Here's Brad getting things fitted. Out of all of the parts of the car, I'm probably the most excited to see this interior -- it is something quite complex and really special. 

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DannyP posted:
Stan Galat posted:
Lane Anderson posted:

I hope to see this in the flesh someday, Anand.  Beautiful!

Me too. Enough to want to drive up to Breman.

The heck with that! I want to go out and visit those Westcoasters once it is finished.

But yeah, that makes sense since you're a lot closer, Stan.

You might want to plan sooner than later Anand enjoys the build process but does not hang on to them very long most times  

@DannyP — you’re always welcome at my home. Come on out!!

Carey and Brad finished getting the metal ferrules in place to guide the vinyl. I’d imagine they’ll start stretching it over the firewall very soon. They’ll grind down the welds first and make sure everything is smooth.

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The original car has the these little pieces on the bottom of the door edges. Once again, @edsnova has replicated them incredibly well. Carey saw them in a picture and decided to make them (just this once, I was not responsible for this addition). I think he did a *superb* job. 

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I haven't seen what Ed did, but would be interested in his interpretation as well.  Seems Porsche tried several things to overcome the lack of door seals in the Spyder, this being one of them.  They also added windlass foam, wrapped in vinyl, which we'll be doing.  They did it both on the doors and on the body, but I prefer the look of it not he door, edging up to the padded door tops.

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