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This is an app called “Tiltmaster Pro.” It used to have more features, I get the suspicion they’re re-writing it because it wouldn’t open for about a month. I can’t count the number of times I used it hanging pictures, adjusting rake angle on my Ducati, checking my camber, checking for bent rims, etc, etc, etc.  Even checking my storage unit floor for level.

And it’s free.
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Last edited by dlearl476

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Speaking of tools, I should have posted this yesterday when the discussion was more weather related, but I was on the road, with no video editing tools.

So, a day late, here's why I was having a hard time understanding Stan's griping about too much water. I was about ten miles south of Monterey, surrounded by water, and no one was complaining about the humidity. You east coast types are a finicky lot.



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@dlearl476 - I can't find anything abut "Tiltmaster Pro" in the Apple App store or via Google.  Any ideas?  Seems like it would be handy.

Apologies, it is actually called “TiltMeter”. It’s been so ling since I killed at the title page, I forgot what it was called.
Carlos Hernandez is the developer. For some reason, I can’t C&P a link from the App Store.

ps: To use it on my wheels I put my phone against a straight edge across the rims from bead to bead.

Last edited by dlearl476

"

Do you know how many concrete garage floors are NOT level?

Lot's of 'em."

Very true.  Most are pitched for water runoff.  When I visited the The Racer's Group shop in Mooresville, NC, they had special areas in the shop where they did suspension set-up.  Those areas had a super-hard, poured pad of epoxy held in place by a small rubber dam all around.  The whole thing was maybe a 9' X 16' rectangle and maybe 2" deep.  Pour the stuff in and it settles into a perfectly flat, level surface and then cures and stays that way because of the dam around it.  Everybody in racing doing suspension setup does it on a pad like that.

For the rest of us, just plan on a non-level floor and make do.

Last edited by Gordon Nichols
@dlearl476 posted:

We're having some pretty good rain this week. Some big storms are due Friday and Saturday as well. Small lecture on the local news tonight how it's important to saturate the hills prior to snowfall, otherwise the spring runoff soaks into the ground vs running downhill and filling the reservoirs.

The real problem is 89% of our rainfall ends up in the ocean. We need tens of millions of gallons more water storage than what we have. Our political leaders, and I use that term loosely, feel it’s not a worthy investment so they let the water flow to the ocean.

OK, tomorrow I'll adjust camber on the one wheel that is out (easy).  I'll also crawl under the car and see if an idea I have for setting rear toe and thrust angle will work.  If so, it should be relatively easy.  The jack stands and string idea would work, but you have to get the car precisely centered.  If my idea works I can easily make a jig that I can reuse if needed.  I'll design it to work front and rear and so that I can use it with the car on ramps so that I can adjust and measure without moving the car.  I may be a it ambitious, but it could be a fun project (or not).

Last edited by Lane Anderson

While on the topic of suspension. I had some time yesterday to get under the car and check attachments after the SMO driving event and found that I could take up a few threads on the front beams bolts. I suspect with two caster shims which are aluminum and the chatter off of the road surface of the Deliverence run some compression occurred (Ya think) in the shims.

Just a heads up for anyone with this setup that drives a beam as if it were a real suspension.

As a note, my steering wheel did stay connected for the full three days of hard driving and with the addition  of Martys old wheel with the Saint Christopher center horn button it left no doubt that I would not be a tree ornament this time out.

Well, we didn't make the Tour de Smo', but we did go on a four day driving tour of Eastern Ontario and Quebec.  Lots of great roads, interesting car, and fun people.

Here we are crossing an old iron bridge, with a few oldsters behind.  There was a professional photographer at various sites along the routes.  The tour is organized so you have no idea where the route is, until you show up at the drivers' meeting.  All hotels, meals, etc. are arranged.  We did get a chance to get in a surprise visit with our grandkids in Ottawa for an hour or two - an added bonus...

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Got the headlights corrected (PPF guy had swapped them from side to side) and camber equalized.  So far the thrust angle appears to be due to to much toe-in on the right side.  I'll equalize them and then see where I am., but that can wait until tomorrow.  I need a shower and a beer.

While giving a couple of buddies rides today I found out it was waaay too easy to hit the rev limiter in first and second well before you expect it.  This thing is a rocket.

@chines1, what is the rev limiter set at, 6500 or 7000?

Last edited by Lane Anderson
@Bob: IM S6 posted:

Well, we didn't make the Tour de Smo', but we did go on a four day driving tour of Eastern Ontario and Quebec.  Lots of great roads, interesting car, and fun people.

Here we are crossing an old iron bridge, with a few oldsters behind.  There was a professional photographer at various sites along the routes.  The tour is organized so you have no idea where the route is, until you show up at the drivers' meeting.  All hotels, meals, etc. are arranged.  We did get a chance to get in a surprise visit with our grandkids in Ottawa for an hour or two - an added bonus...

21-09-24+Maple+Mille+0120 [1)

Great stuff Bob !  

When I was down in Beaufort I was into playing with the suspension and made the adjustments on a drive-on 4-post lift.  To make it easier to do the adjustments, I placed two 12” square linoleum tiles under each tire with the shiny side in the middle between each two.  You could easily place them on the lift and then just drive right onto them.  Once in place it was super easy to make toe-in adjustments as it was pretty slippery between them.  They’re really cheap at Lowe’s, too, and totally re-useable.

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